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A Comparative Study of Fluoroquinolone-Resistant Escherichia coli Lineages Portrays Indistinguishable Pathogenicity- and Survivability-Associated Phenotypic Characteristics Between ST1193 and ST131

Authors Huang J, Zhang S, Zhang S, Zhao Z, Cao Y, Chen M, Li B

Received 19 August 2020

Accepted for publication 19 October 2020

Published 20 November 2020 Volume 2020:13 Pages 4167—4175

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/IDR.S277681

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single anonymous peer review

Peer reviewer comments 2

Editor who approved publication: Professor Suresh Antony


Jiangqing Huang,1 Shengcen Zhang,1 Shuyu Zhang,2 Zhichang Zhao,3 Yingping Cao,1 Min Chen,2 Bin Li1

1Department of Clinical Laboratory, Fujian Medical University Union Hospital, Fuzhou, Fujian 350001, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Laboratory Medicine, Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou, Fujian 350001, People’s Republic of China; 3Department of Pharmacy, Fujian Medical University Union Hospital, Fuzhou, Fujian 350001, People’s Republic of China

Correspondence: Bin Li
Department of Clinical Laboratory, Fujian Medical University Union Hospital, 29 Xinquan Road, Fuzhou, Fujian 350001, People’s Republic of China
Email leonlee307@hotmail.com

Background: Sequence type 1193 is a new such lineage among fluoroquinolone-resistant Escherichia coli, which has risen dramatically within the last several years. However, reasons for rapid emergence and successful spread of E. coli ST1193 remain unclear. The aim of this study was to compare the pathogenicity and survivability features of E. coli ST1193 with global epidemic lineage, ST131.
Methods: A total of 30 E. coli were used in this study. Isolates were divided into two groups, ST1193 (n=15) and ST131 (n=15). Adhesion and invasion to T24 cells and resistance to serum were quantified and compared among two groups. Biofilm formation capacity was assessed by crystal violet assay. Macrocolony formation was assessed on macrocolony formation plates. Resistance to hydrogen peroxide was performed by broth microdilution. RAW264.7 cells were used to assess the anti-phagocytic function of different isolates.
Results: Adhesion and invasion assays revealed that E. coli ST1193 could adhere and invade T24 cells (p < 0.05). 93.3% of E. coli ST1193 could form biofilms. The majority of E. coli ST1193 (66.7%) possessed no curli/no cellulose on macrocolony formation plates. E. coli ST1193 showed significant growth in serum and hydrogen peroxide and illustrated higher anti-phagocytic function to RAW264.7 cells (p < 0.05). Group analysis showed that E. coli ST1193 was similar to ST131 in pathogenicity- and survivability-associated phenotypic characteristics (p > 0.05).
Conclusion: Our study provided more insights into pathogenicity and survivability features of E. coli ST1193, which was similar to ST131. Our study could be of great importance in understanding the emergence of global spread E. coli ST1193. Strategic and continued surveillance should be carried out to prevent the infections caused by E. coli ST1193.

Keywords: ST1193, ST131, pathogenicity, survivability

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