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The effects of repeated Ozurdex injections on ocular hypertension

Authors Bahadorani S, Krambeer C, Wannamaker K, Tie W, Jansen M, Espitia J, Sohn JH, Singer MA

Received 12 August 2017

Accepted for publication 30 November 2017

Published 3 April 2018 Volume 2018:12 Pages 639—642

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/OPTH.S148990

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewers approved by Dr Colin Mak

Peer reviewer comments 2

Editor who approved publication: Dr Scott Fraser


Sepehr Bahadorani,1 Chelsey Krambeer,2 Kendall Wannamaker,1 Wayne Tie,1 Michael Jansen,1 Jason Espitia,2 Jeong-Hyeon Sohn,1 Michael A Singer2

1Department of Ophthalmology, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX, USA; 2Medical Center Ophthalmology Associates, San Antonio, TX, USA

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to correlate the degree of ocular hypertension with the number of Ozurdex injections.
Methods: Intraocular pressure (IOP) fluctuations for a total of 183 injections were studied over a period of at least 12 months. The main indications for treatment were uveitis, diabetic macular edema, and retinal vein occlusion.
Results: Results of the study demonstrate that repeated Ozurdex injections do not increase the frequency of IOP spikes beyond 30 mmHg. For lower IOPs, however, a positive correlation exists. Furthermore, patients with primary open angle glaucoma and uveitis had the highest IOP response to repeated injections. On average, patients with an IOP of ≥28.6 mmHg received pressure lowering medications, after which their IOP reached a stable level (16.7 mmHg) without the need for additional interventions.
Conclusion: The data support the conclusion that multiple Ozurdex injections does not increase the frequency of IOP spikes beyond 30 mmHg, but patients still must be closely monitored if they have a history of primary open angle glaucoma.

Keywords: Ozurdex, dexamethasone, glaucoma, intraocular pressure, ocular hypertension

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