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Somatization, obsessive-compulsive symptoms, and job satisfaction of the prison medical workers in Jiangxi, China

Authors Liu X, Jiang D, Li B, Lu Y, Mao Z

Received 28 February 2018

Accepted for publication 18 May 2018

Published 20 July 2018 Volume 2018:11 Pages 249—257

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/PRBM.S166868

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewers approved by Dr Colin Mak

Peer reviewer comments 2

Editor who approved publication: Professor Igor Elman


Xiaojun Liu,1,2 Dongdong Jiang,1 Baojing Li,1 Yuanan Lu,2,3 Zongfu Mao1,2

1Department of Social Medicine and Health Management, School of Health Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071, China; 2Global Health Institute, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071, China; 3Department of Public Health, University of Hawaii at Maˉnoa, Honolulu, HI, USA

Purpose: This study evaluated the current situation and possible influencing factors associated with prison medical workers’ (PMWs’) somatization, obsessive-compulsive symptoms, and their job satisfaction.
Participants and methods: The Chinese version of Symptom Checklist-90-R (SCL-90-R) was used to assess PMWs’ mental health conditions. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify the main factors associated with PMWs’ somatization, obsessive-compulsive symptoms, and their job satisfaction. The correlations between PMWs’ somatization, obsessive-compulsive symptoms, and job satisfaction were examined.
Results: The positive detection rates of somatization and obsessive-compulsive symptoms among the PMWs were 22.73% and 47.27%, respectively. Age, educational level, and length of working in prison were factors related to the PMWs’ mental health. Half of the PMWs were not satisfied with their current job, particularly the females and young workers with a shorter period of service. PMWs’ somatization is strongly positively correlated with obsessive-compulsive symptoms, while job satisfaction is negatively correlated with having somatization symptoms and obsessive-compulsive disorders.
Conclusion: PMWs with lower educational level, elderly workers, and new employees have higher risk and more serious somatization and obsessive-compulsive symptoms. The female and young PMWs with a short service time were particularly not satisfied with their job. Findings from this study indicated that it is important and necessary to improve PMWs’ job satisfaction in order to reduce their somatization symptoms and obsessive-compulsive disorders.

Keywords: prison medical workers, somatization, obsessive-compulsive symptoms, job satisfaction

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