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SIDRE: Symptomatic Improvement of Dry Eye Study

Authors De Paz CJ, Gonzalez AL, Ngo C

Received 27 December 2016

Accepted for publication 24 February 2017

Published 16 March 2017 Volume 2017:9 Pages 49—54

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/OPTO.S131164

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewers approved by Dr Colin Mak

Peer reviewer comments 2

Editor who approved publication: Mr Simon Berry


Clarissa J De Paz, Agustin L Gonzalez, Chi Ngo

Eye & Vision, Richardson, TX, USA

Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of lifitegrast 5% ophthalmic solution in reducing the symptoms of eye dryness using Ocular Surface Disease Index (OSDI) questionnaire.
Methods: A single-center study was undertaken to evaluate the clinical outcomes. Fourteen subjects (12 female and 2 male) with symptoms of dry eye and a positive history of recent use of artificial tears were included in the study. OSDI questionnaire scores on the severity of symptoms, visual functionality, and quality of life related to the condition were recorded pre- and post-therapy. Subsequently, score data were analyzed for statistical significance.
Results: The mean age of the 14 subjects was 44.86 (standard deviation [SD] ±3.08) years, with a range of 23–62 years. Mean duration of the evaluation was 28.79 days with a range of 25–34 days. Baseline OSDI mean score was 49.40 (SD ±1.28), and post-therapy mean score was 42.26 (SD ±0.99). Data analysis revealed that the scores were statistically significantly improved post-lifitegrast therapy in comparison to baseline (p=0.00041).
Conclusion: Lifitegrast 5% ophthalmic solution may be a beneficial therapeutic option in the management of symptoms associated with dry eye disease.

Keywords: dry eye disease, ocular surface disease, dry eye treatment, lifitegrast

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