Back to Journals » Clinical Interventions in Aging » Volume 14

Reduced Vitamin D Levels are Associated with Stroke-Associated Pneumonia in Patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke

Authors Huang GQ, Cheng HR, Wu YM, Cheng QQ, Wang YM, Fu JL, Zhou HX, Wang Z

Received 8 September 2019

Accepted for publication 17 December 2019

Published 31 December 2019 Volume 2019:14 Pages 2305—2314

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/CIA.S230255

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewer comments 2

Editor who approved publication: Dr Zhi-Ying Wu


Gui-Qian Huang, 1,* Hao-Ran Cheng, 1,* Yue-Min Wu, 1 Qian-Qian Cheng, 2 Yu-Min Wang, 3 Jia-Li Fu, 3 Hui-Xin Zhou, 3 Zhen Wang 1

1Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou 325000, Zhejiang, People’s Republic of China; 2School of Mental Health, Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou 325000, Zhejiang, People’s Republic of China; 3Department of Laboratory Medicine, The First Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou 325000, Zhejiang, People’s Republic of China

*These authors contributed equally to this work

Correspondence: Zhen Wang
Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou 325000, Zhejiang, People’s Republic of China
Tel +86 577-555780166
Fax +86 577-55578033
Email wangzhen_wenzhou@163.com

Background and aim: Stroke-associated pneumonia (SAP) is a common complication in patients with acute ischemic stroke (AIS). This study explored the potential relationship between serum vitamin D levels and SAP.
Methods: This study recruited 863 consecutive AIS patients. In-hospital SAP was defined as a complication that occurred after stroke, during hospitalization, that was confirmed radiographically. Serum vitamin D levels were measured within 24 hrs of admission and the patients were divided into vitamin D sufficient (> 50 nmol/L), insufficient (25– 50 nmol/L), and deficient (< 25 nmol/L) groups.
Results: In this study, 102 (11.8%) patients were diagnosed with SAP. Compared to the patients without SAP, patients with SAP had significantly lower vitamin D levels (P = 0.023). The incidence of SAP was significantly higher in patients with vitamin D deficiency than in those with vitamin D insufficiency or sufficiency (21.2% vs 16.2% & 9.5%, P = 0.006). After adjusting for confounders, vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency were independently associated with SAP (OR = 3.034, 95% CI = 1.207– 7.625, P = 0.018; OR = 1.921, 95% CI = 1.204– 3.066, P = 0.006, respectively). In multiple-adjusted spline regression, vitamin D levels showed a linear association with the risk of SAP (P < 0.001 for linearity).
Conclusion: Reduced vitamin D is a potential risk factor of in-hospital SAP, which can help clinicians identify high-risk SAP patients.

Keywords: acute ischemic stroke, stroke-associated pneumonia, vitamin D

A Letter to the Editor has been published for this article.

Creative Commons License This work is published and licensed by Dove Medical Press Limited. The full terms of this license are available at https://www.dovepress.com/terms.php and incorporate the Creative Commons Attribution - Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License. By accessing the work you hereby accept the Terms. Non-commercial uses of the work are permitted without any further permission from Dove Medical Press Limited, provided the work is properly attributed. For permission for commercial use of this work, please see paragraphs 4.2 and 5 of our Terms.

Download Article [PDF]  View Full Text [HTML][Machine readable]