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Postoperative outcome of three different procedures for childhood glaucoma

Authors Huang H, Bao WJ, Yamamoto T, Kawase K, Sawada A

Received 8 September 2018

Accepted for publication 20 November 2018

Published 17 December 2018 Volume 2019:13 Pages 1—7

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/OPTH.S186929

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewers approved by Dr Jie Zhang

Peer reviewer comments 5

Editor who approved publication: Dr Scott Fraser


Hailong Huang, Wenjun J Bao, Tetsuya Yamamoto, Kazuhide Kawase, Akira Sawada

Department of Ophthalmology, Gifu University Graduate School of Medicine, Gifu, Japan

Purpose: To investigate the long-term postoperative outcome of three surgical procedures for childhood glaucoma.
Patients and methods:
In this retrospective study, the patients were divided into a goniotomy group, a trabeculotomy group, and a filtering surgery group, based on the initial surgical procedure. Failure was defined as an IOP ≥21 mmHg with medication at two consecutive visits. A Kaplan–Meier analysis was applied to calculate the probability of success. Additional metrics included IOP, number of additional operations, eye drop scores, and visual acuity.
Results: We studied 40 eyes of 25 patients, 21 eyes of 15 patients, and 12 eyes of 7 patients in the goniotomy, trabeculotomy, and filtering surgery groups, respectively. The 10- and 20-year probability of success was 65.2% and 65.2%, 42.2% and NA (no data for 20 years), and 91.7% and 80.2% for the goniotomy, trabeculotomy, and filtering surgery groups, respectively.
Conclusion: All three procedures maintained an IOP of less than 21 mmHg for up to 10 years in 65.2%, 42.2%, and 91.7% of childhood glaucoma cases.

Keywords: childhood glaucoma, goniotomy, trabeculotomy, filtering surgery, long-term outcome

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