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Liposomal extended-release bupivacaine for postsurgical analgesia

Authors Lambrechts M, O'Brien MJ, Savoie FH, You Z

Received 17 June 2013

Accepted for publication 27 July 2013

Published 6 September 2013 Volume 2013:7 Pages 885—890

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/PPA.S32175

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewer comments 3

Mark Lambrechts,1,2 Michael J O’Brien,2 Felix H Savoie,2 Zongbing You1–3

1Department of Structural and Cellular Biology, 2Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Tulane Institute of Sports Medicine, 3Tulane Cancer Center, Louisiana Cancer Research Consortium, Tulane Center for Aging, Tulane Center for Stem Cell Research and Regenerative Medicine, Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA

Abstract:
When physicians consider which analgesia to use postsurgery, the primary goal is to relieve pain with minimal adverse side effects. Bupivacaine, a commonly used analgesic, has been formulated into an aqueous suspension of multivesicular liposomes that provide long-lasting analgesia for up to 72 hours, while avoiding the adverse side effects of opioids. The increased efficacy of liposomal extended-release bupivacaine, compared to bupivacaine hydrochloride, has promoted its usage in a variety of surgeries including hemorrhoidectomy, bunionectomy, inguinal hernia repair, total knee arthroplasty, and augmentation mammoplasty. However, like other bupivacaine formulations, the liposomal extended-release bupivacaine does have some side effects. In this brief review, we provide an update of the current knowledge in the use of bupivacaine for postsurgical analgesia.
Keywords: bupivacaine, liposome, analgesia, side effects, efficacy, patient satisfaction

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