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Intravitreal methotrexate infusion for proliferative vitreoretinopathy

Authors Sadaka A, Sisk R, Osher J, Toygar O, Duncan M, Riemann C

Received 3 May 2016

Accepted for publication 11 July 2016

Published 19 September 2016 Volume 2016:10 Pages 1811—1817

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/OPTH.S111893

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewers approved by Dr Amy Norman

Peer reviewer comments 2

Editor who approved publication: Dr Scott Fraser


Ama Sadaka,1 Robert A Sisk,1–3 James M Osher,1,3 Okan Toygar,4 Melinda K Duncan,5 Christopher D Riemann1,3

1Department of Ophthalmology, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, 2Department of Opthalmology, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, 3Cincinnati Eye Institute, Cincinnati, OH, USA; 4Department of Ophthalmology, Bahcesehir University Medical Faculty, Istanbul, Turkey; 5Department of Biological Sciences, University of Delaware, Newark, DE, USA

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate intravitreal methotrexate infusion (IMI) during pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) for retinal detachment in patients with high risk for the development of proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR).
Methods: Patients presenting with severe recurrent PVR with tractional retinal detachment and/or a history of severe ocular inflammation were treated with IMI. Clinical outcomes were determined from a retrospective medical chart review.
Results: Twenty-nine eyes presenting with either tractional retinal detachment and recurrent PVR (n=22) or a history of severe inflammation associated with high PVR risk (n=7) received IMI during PPV. Best-corrected visual acuity at 6 months was ≥20/200 in 19 of 29 eyes (66%) and remained stable or improved compared with initial presentation in 24 of 29 eyes (83%). At the last follow-up examination, the retinas of 26 of 29 eyes (90%) remained attached after IMI while three eyes required another reattachment procedure. Three additional eyes (10%) developed recurrent limited PVR without recurrent RD and were observed. No complications attributable to IMI occurred during a mean follow-up of 27 months.
Conclusion: Eyes at high risk for PVR development due to a history of prior PVR or intraocular inflammation had a low incidence of PVR following IMI at the time of PPV for RD repair. No significant safety issues from IMI were observed in this series.

Keywords: tractional retinal detachment, recurrent retinal detachment, pars plana vitrectomy
 

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