Back to Journals » Patient Preference and Adherence » Volume 7

Factors determining patients' intentions to use point-of-care testing medical devices for self-monitoring: the case of international normalized ratio self-testing

Authors Shah SGS, Barnett J, Kuljis J, Hone K, Kaczmarski R

Received 20 September 2012

Accepted for publication 30 October 2012

Published 28 December 2012 Volume 2013:7 Pages 1—14

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/PPA.S38328

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewer comments 3


Syed Ghulam Sarwar Shah,1 Julie Barnett,1 Jasna Kuljis,2 Kate Hone,2 Richard Kaczmarski3

1Multidisciplinary Assessment of Technology Centre for Healthcare, 2Department of Information Systems and Computing, Brunel University London, Uxbridge, Middlesex, UK; 3Department of Haematology, Hillingdon Hospital, Uxbridge, Middlesex, UK

Purpose: To identify factors that determine patients' intentions to use point-of-care medical devices, ie, portable coagulometer devices for self-testing of the international normalized ratio (INR) required for ongoing monitoring of blood-coagulation intensity among patients on long-term oral anticoagulation therapy with vitamin K antagonists, eg, warfarin.
Methods: A cross-sectional study that applied the technology-acceptance model through a self-completed questionnaire, which was administered to a convenience sample of 125 outpatients attending outpatient anticoagulation services at a district general hospital in London, UK. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, factor analyses, and structural equation modeling.
Results: The participants were mainly male (64%) and aged ≥ 71 years (60%). All these patients were attending the hospital outpatient anticoagulation clinic for INR testing; only two patients were currently using INR self-testing, 84% of patients had no knowledge about INR self-testing using a portable coagulometer device, and 96% of patients were never offered the option of the INR self-testing. A significant structural equation model explaining 79% of the variance in patients’ intentions to use INR self-testing was observed. The significant predictors that directly affected patients' intention to use INR self-testing were the perception of technology (β = 0.92, P < 0.001), trust in doctor (β = −0.24, P = 0.028), and affordability (β = 0.15, P = 0.016). In addition, the perception of technology was significantly affected by trust in doctor (β = 0.43, P = 0.002), age (β = −0.32, P < 0.001), and affordability (β = 0.23, P = 0.013); thereby, the intention to use INR self-testing was indirectly affected by trust in doctor (β = 0.40), age (β = −0.29), and affordability (β = 0.21) via the perception of technology.
Conclusion: Patients’ intentions to use portable coagulometers for INR self-testing are affected by patients' perceptions about the INR testing device, the cost of device, trust in doctors/clinicians, and the age of the patient, which need to be considered prior to any intervention involving INR self-testing by patients. Manufacturers should focus on increasing the affordability of INR testing devices for patients’ self-testing and on the potential role of medical practitioners in supporting use of these medical devices as patients move from hospital to home testing.

Keywords: oral anticoagulation, INR self-testing, technology-acceptance model, trust in doctor, home testing, affordability, structural equation modeling

Creative Commons License This work is published and licensed by Dove Medical Press Limited. The full terms of this license are available at https://www.dovepress.com/terms.php and incorporate the Creative Commons Attribution - Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License. By accessing the work you hereby accept the Terms. Non-commercial uses of the work are permitted without any further permission from Dove Medical Press Limited, provided the work is properly attributed. For permission for commercial use of this work, please see paragraphs 4.2 and 5 of our Terms.

Download Article [PDF]  View Full Text [HTML][Machine readable]