Back to Journals » Medical Devices: Evidence and Research » Volume 11

Detection of endoscopic looping during colonoscopy procedure by using embedded bending sensors

Authors Bruce M, Choi JH

Received 21 July 2017

Accepted for publication 23 February 2018

Published 18 May 2018 Volume 2018:11 Pages 171—191

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/MDER.S146934

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewers approved by Dr Cristina Weinberg

Peer reviewer comments 3

Editor who approved publication: Dr Scott Fraser


Michael Bruce,1 JungHun Choi2

1Department of Mechanical Engineering, Ohio University, Athens, OH, USA; 2Department of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Southern University, Statesboro, GA, USA

Background: Looping of the colonoscope shaft during procedure is one of the most common obstacles encountered by colonoscopists. It occurs in 91% of cases with the N-sigmoid loop being the most common, occurring in 79% of cases.
Purpose: Herein, a novel system is developed that will give a complete three-dimensional (3D) vector image of the shaft as it passes through the colon, to aid the colonoscopist in detecting loops before they form.
Patients and methods: A series of connected links spans the middle 50% of the shaft, where loops are likely to form. Two potentiometers are attached at each joint to measure angular deflection in two directions to allow for 3D positioning. This 3D positioning is converted into a 3D vector image using computer software. MATLAB software has been used to display the image on a computer monitor. For the different configuration of the colon model, the system determined the looping status.
Results: Different configurations (N loop, reverse gamma loop, and reverse splenic flexure) of the loops were well defined using 3D vector image.
Conclusion: The novel sensory system can accurately define the various configuration of the colon during the colonoscopy procedure.

Keywords: colonoscopy, endoscopy, loop, 3D vector image, intubation

Creative Commons License This work is published and licensed by Dove Medical Press Limited. The full terms of this license are available at https://www.dovepress.com/terms.php and incorporate the Creative Commons Attribution - Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License. By accessing the work you hereby accept the Terms. Non-commercial uses of the work are permitted without any further permission from Dove Medical Press Limited, provided the work is properly attributed. For permission for commercial use of this work, please see paragraphs 4.2 and 5 of our Terms.

Download Article [PDF]  View Full Text [HTML][Machine readable]