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Depo-Provera (depot medroxyprogesterone acetate) use after bariatric surgery

Authors Lam C, Murthy A

Received 5 December 2015

Accepted for publication 11 April 2016

Published 29 September 2016 Volume 2016:7 Pages 143—150

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/OAJC.S84097

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewers approved by Dr Manisha Yadav

Peer reviewer comments 2

Editor who approved publication: Professor Igal Wolman


Clarissa Lam,1 Amitasrigowri S Murthy2,3

1New York University School of Medicine, 2Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Bellevue Hospital Center, New York University School of Medicine, 3New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY, USA

Abstract: In the US, obesity rates are increasing greatly. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that 68.5% of Americans, including 63.9% of adult women older than 20 years, are overweight (body mass index between 25 kg/m2 and 29.9 kg/m2) or obese (body mass index >30 kg/m2). In light of this, it is not surprising that the rates of bariatric surgery have also been increasing. When considering the metabolic changes associated with both bariatric surgery and contraceptive use, in combination with the unique medical considerations of obese women, it is indisputable that clear guidelines are needed when counseling obese patients of reproductive age after bariatric surgery. In this literature review, we focus on depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA) and the implications of its use in obese women, preweight and postweight loss following bariatric surgery. Both DMPA use and bariatric surgery are known to cause bone loss, but it is still unclear whether there is an additive effect of the two factors on bone loss and whether either of these factors directly leads to an increased risk of bone fracture. The current consensus guidelines do not impose a restriction on the use of DMPA after bariatric surgery. DMPA use is associated with weight gain, and it is unclear whether weight loss blunting occurs with the use of DMPA after bariatric surgery. Prior studies had demonstrated an association with weight gain in adolescents, and therefore, those prescribing DMPA use after bariatric surgery in adolescents should proceed with caution. Adult women do not have a similar response to the use of DMPA. DMPA use has rarely been associated with increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE). The obesity-associated increase in VTE should be mitigated by surgically induced weight loss. The concurrent use of DMPA in the post bariatric surgical period should not further increase the risk of VTE.

Keywords: bariatric surgery, DMPA, Depo-Provera, venous thromboembolism, bone loss, weight loss blunting, appetite changes

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