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Decade-long trends (1999–2009) in the characteristics, management, and hospital outcomes of patients hospitalized with acute myocardial infarction with prior diabetes and chronic kidney disease

Authors Tisminetzky M, McManus D, Dor A, Miozzo R, Yarzebski J, Gore J, Goldberg R

Received 5 December 2014

Accepted for publication 17 January 2015

Published 5 May 2015 Volume 2015:8 Pages 41—51

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/IJNRD.S78749

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewer comments 3

Editor who approved publication: Professor Pravin Singhal


Mayra Tisminetzky,1 David D McManus,1,2 Alon Dor,2 Ruben Miozzo,3,4 Jorge Yarzebski,1 Joel M Gore,2 Robert J Goldberg1,2

1Department of Quantitative Health Sciences, 2Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA, 3Department of Psychiatry, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, 4Department of Psychiatry, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA, USA

Background: Despite the increasing magnitude and impact, there are limited data available on the clinical management and in-hospital outcomes of patients who have diabetes mellitus (DM) and chronic kidney disease (CKD) at the time of hospitalization for acute myocardial infarction (AMI). The objectives of our population-based observational study in residents of central Massachusetts were to describe decade-long trends (1999–2009) in the characteristics, in-hospital management, and hospital outcomes of AMI patients with and without these comorbidities.
Methods: We reviewed the medical records of 6,018 persons who were hospitalized for AMI on a biennial basis between 1999 and 2009 at all eleven medical centers in central Massachusetts. Our sample consisted of the following four groups: DM with CKD (n=587), CKD without DM (n=524), DM without CKD (n=1,442), and non-DM/non-CKD (n=3,465).
Results: Diabetic patients with CKD were more likely to have a higher prevalence of previously diagnosed comorbidities, to have developed heart failure acutely, and to have a longer hospital stay compared with non-DM/non-CKD patients. Between 1999 and 2009, there were marked increases in the prescribing of beta-blockers, statins, and aspirin for patients with CKD and DM as compared to those without these comorbidities. In-hospital death rates remained unchanged in patients with DM and CKD, while they declined markedly in patients with CKD without DM (20.2% dying in 1999; 11.3% dying in 2009).
Conclusion: Despite increases in the prescribing of effective cardiac medications, AMI patients with DM and CKD continue to experience high in-hospital death rates.

Keywords: diabetes, chronic kidney disease, myocardial infarction

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