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Measuring severe adverse events and medication selection using a “PEER Report” for nonpsychotic patients: a retrospective chart review

Authors Hoffman DA, DeBattista C, Valuck RJ, Iosifescu DV

Published Date June 2012 Volume 2012:8 Pages 277—284

DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/NDT.S31665

Received 10 March 2012, Accepted 4 April 2012, Published 21 June 2012

Daniel A Hoffman,1 Charles DeBattista,2 Rob J Valuck,3 Dan V Iosifescu4

1Neuro-Therapy Clinic, Inc, Denver, CO, USA; 2Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, CA, USA; 3University of Colorado, SKAGES School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Aurora, CO, USA; 4Mood and Anxiety Disorders Program, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA

Abstract: We previously reported on an objective new tool that uses quantitative electroencephalography (QEEG) normative- and referenced-electroencephalography sampling databases (currently called Psychiatric EEG Evaluation Registry [PEER]), which may assist physicians in determining medication selection for optimal efficacy to overcome trial-and-error prescribing. The PEER test compares drug-free QEEG features for individual patients to a database of patients with similar EEG patterns and known outcomes after pharmacological interventions. Based on specific EEG data elements and historical outcomes, the PEER Report may also serve as a marker of future severe adverse events (eg, agitation, hostility, aggressiveness, suicidality, homicidality, mania, hypomania) with specific medications. We used a retrospective chart review to investigate the clinical utility of such a registry in a naturalistic environment.
Results: This chart review demonstrated significant improvement on the global assessment scales Clinical Global Impression – Improvement and Quality of Life Enjoyment and Satisfaction – Short Form as well as time to maximum medical improvement and decreased suicidality occurrences. The review also showed that 54.5% of previous medications causing a severe adverse event would have been raised as a caution had the PEER Report been available at the time the drug was prescribed. Finally, due to the significant amount of off-label prescribing of psychotropic medications, additional, objective, evidence-based data aided the prescriber toward better choices.
Conclusion: The PEER Report may be useful, particularly in treatment-resistant patients, in helping to guide medication selection. Based on the preliminary data obtained from this chart review, additional studies are warranted to establish the safety and efficacy of adding PEER data when making medication decisions.

Keywords: PEER, referenced-EEG, QEEG, adverse events, medication selection, off label

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