skip to content
Dovepress - Open Access to Scientific and Medical Research
View our mobile site

15319

Impact of laughter on air trapping in severe chronic obstructive lung disease



Original Research

(5235) Total Article Views


Authors: Martin H Brutsche, Paul Grossman, Rebekka E Müller, Jan Wiegand, Pello, et al

Published Date March 2008 Volume 2008:3(1) Pages 185 - 192
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/COPD.S2204

Martin H Brutsche1, Paul Grossman2, Rebekka E Müller1, Jan Wiegand1, Pello3, Florent Baty1, Willibald Ruch4

1Pneumology; 2Psycho-Somatic Medicine, University Hospital Basel, Petersgraben, Basel, Switzerland; 3Pello, Clown, Basel, Switzerland; 4Psychology, University of Zurich, Department of Psychology, Zurich, Switzerland

Abstract: Static and dynamic hyperinflation is an important factor of exertional dyspnea in patients with severe COPD. This proof-of-concept intervention trial sought to study whether laughter can reduce hyperinflation through repetitive expiratory efforts in patients with severe COPD. For small groups of patients with severe COPD (n = 19) and healthy controls (n = 10) Pello the clown performed a humor intervention triggering regular laughter. Plethysmography was done before and up to 24 hours after intervention. Laughing and smiling were quantified with video-analysis. Real-time breathing pattern was assessed with the LifeShirt™, and the psychological impact of the intervention was monitored with self-administered questionnaires. The intervention led to a reduction of TLC in COPD (p = 0.04), but not in controls (p = 0.9). TLC reduction was due to a decline of the residual volume. Four (22 [CI 95% 7 to 46] %) patients were ≥10% responders. The frequency of smiling and TLC at baseline were independent predictors of TLC response. The humor intervention improved cheerfulness, but not seriousness nor bad mood. In conclusion, smiling induced by a humor intervention was able to reduce hyperinflation in patients with severe COPD. A smiling-derived breathing technique might complement pursed-lips breathing in patients with symptomatic obstruction.

Keywords: bronchodilator, cheerfulness, COPD, dyspnoea, humor, hyperinflation




Post to:
Cannotea Citeulike Del.icio.us Facebook LinkedIn Twitter


Readers of this article also read:

  • Journal Indexing

    See where all the Dove Press journals are indexed.

  • Testimonials

    "I was impressed at the rapidity of publication from submission to final acceptance." Dr Edwin Thrower, PhD, Yale University.

  • MLA'14 -

    May 16–21, 2014
    Chicago

  • ERS Int'l Congress

    6 - 10 September, 2014
    Munich, Germany

  • CHEST 2014

    25 - 30 October, 2014
    Austin, Texas