skip to content
Dovepress - Open Access to Scientific and Medical Research
View our mobile site

15370

Characterization and evolution of dermal filaments from patients with Morgellons disease



Original Research

(23922) Total Article Views


Authors: Middelveen MJ, Mayne PJ, Kahn DG, Stricker RB


Video abstract presented by Raphael B Stricker
Views: 2161

Published Date January 2013 Volume 2013:6 Pages 1 - 21
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/CCID.S39017

Marianne J Middelveen,1 Peter J Mayne,1 Douglas G Kahn,2 Raphael B Stricker1

1International Lyme and Associated Diseases Society, Bethesda, MD, USA; 2Department of Pathology, Olive View–UCLA Medical Center, Sylmar, CA, USA

Abstract: Morgellons disease is an emerging skin disease characterized by formation of dermal filaments associated with multisystemic symptoms and tick-borne illness. Some clinicians hypothesize that these often colorful dermal filaments are textile fibers, either self-implanted by patients or accidentally adhering to lesions, and conclude that patients with this disease have delusions of infestation. We present histological observations and electron microscopic imaging from representative Morgellons disease samples revealing that dermal filaments in these cases are keratin and collagen in composition and result from proliferation and activation of keratinocytes and fibroblasts in the epidermis. Spirochetes were detected in the dermatological specimens from our study patients, providing evidence that Morgellons disease is associated with an infectious process.

Keywords: Morgellons disease, digital dermatitis, Lyme disease, Borrelia burgdorferi, spirochetes, keratin, keratinocytes, collagen, fibroblasts



Post to:
Cannotea Citeulike Del.icio.us Facebook LinkedIn Twitter

 

Other articles by Dr Raphael Stricker


Readers of this article also read:

  • American Acne and Rosacea Society

    The American Acne and Rosacea Society (AARS) is a 501(c)(6) non-profit organization dedicated to elevating the understanding and treatment of acne and rosacea.

  • MLA'14 -

    May 16–21, 2014
    Chicago