Back to Journals » International Journal of General Medicine » Volume 5

Williams–Campbell syndrome: a case report

Authors Konoglou, Porpodis K, Zarogoulidis P, Loridas N, Katsikogiannis N, Mitrakas A, Zervas V, Kontakiotis T, Papakosta D, Boglou P, Bakali S, Courcoutsakis, Zarogoulidis K

Received 21 November 2011

Accepted for publication 12 December 2011

Published 11 January 2012 Volume 2012:5 Pages 41—44

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/IJGM.S28447

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewer comments 3

Maria Konoglou1, Konstantinos Porpodis2, Paul Zarogoulidis2, Nikolaos Loridas1, Nikolaos Katsikogiannis3, Alexandros Mitrakas2, Vasilis Zervas2, Theodoros Kontakiotis2, Despoina Papakosta2, Panagiotis Boglou4, Stamatia Bakali5, Nikolaos Courcoutsakis6, Konstantinos Zarogoulidis2
1First Pulmonary Clinic, "G. Papanikolaou" General Hospital, Thessaloniki, Greece; 2Pulmonary Department, "G. Papanikolaou" General Hospital, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece; 3Surgery Department (NHS), University General Hospital of Alexandroupolis, Greece; 4Pulmonary Department, University General Hospital of Alexandroupolis, Democritus University of Thrace, Greece; 5Microbiology Department, University General Hospital of Alexandroupolis, Democritus University of Thrace, Greece; 6Radiology Department, University General Hospital of Alexandroupolis, Democritus University of Thrace, Greece

Introduction: Williams–Campbell syndrome, also known as bronchomalacia, is a rare disorder characterized by a deficiency of cartilage in subsegmental bronchi, leading to distal airway collapse and bronchiectasis. There have been few reports about patients affected by saccular bronchiectasis, paracicatricial emphysema, and diminished cartilage. These are all characteristic of Williams–Campbell syndrome.
Case presentation: This report presents a 57-year-old woman with progressive dyspnea, cough, sputum production, and fever. The clinical and laboratory examination revealed that the patient had a respiratory infection due to bronchiectasis caused by Williams–Campbell syndrome, which was undiagnosed in the patient until then.
Conclusion: Although a rare syndrome, when patients' signs and symptoms include recurrent respiratory infections, bronchiectasis, productive cough, and dyspnea, Williams–Campbell syndrome should be included in the differential diagnosis.

Keywords: bronchietasis, Williams–Campbell syndrome, bronchomalacia

Creative Commons License This work is published and licensed by Dove Medical Press Limited. The full terms of this license are available at https://www.dovepress.com/terms.php and incorporate the Creative Commons Attribution - Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License. By accessing the work you hereby accept the Terms. Non-commercial uses of the work are permitted without any further permission from Dove Medical Press Limited, provided the work is properly attributed. For permission for commercial use of this work, please see paragraphs 4.2 and 5 of our Terms.

Download Article [PDF]  View Full Text [HTML][Machine readable]