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Using portable negative pressure wound therapy devices in the home care setting

Authors Burke J, Morley R, Khanbhai M

Received 1 September 2014

Accepted for publication 8 October 2014

Published 9 December 2014 Volume 2014:2 Pages 129—135

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/SHTT.S53413

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewer comments 3

Editor who approved publication: Professor Yelena Yesha


Joshua R Burke, Rachael Morley, Mustafa Khanbhai

Academic Surgery Unit, Education and Research Centre, University Hospital of South Manchester, Manchester, UK

Abstract: Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) is the continuous or intermittent application of subatmospheric pressure to the surface of a wound that improves the wound environment, accelerates healing, and reduces wound closure time. Since its first documented use, this technology has lent itself to a number of adaptations, most notably, the development of portable devices facilitating treatment in the home care setting. With advancing surgical standards, wound healing is an important rate-limiting factor in early patient discharge and often a major cost of inpatient treatment. The efficacy of NPWT in the home care setting has been investigated through rate of wound closure, time in care, and patient experience. Rate of wound closure is the most appropriate primary end point. Much can be gleaned from patient experience, but the future success of portable NPWT will be measured on time in care and therefore cost effectiveness. However, there is a lack of level 1a evidence demonstrating increased efficacy of portable over inpatient NPWT. The development of portable NPWT is an encouraging innovation in wound care technology, and extending the benefits to the home care setting is both possible and potentially more beneficial.

Keywords: portable, negative pressure wound therapy, vacuum-assisted closure, topical negative pressure therapy

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