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Transforming nursing education: a review of stressors and strategies that support students' professional socialization

Authors Del Prato, Bankert E, Grust P, Joseph J

Published 6 May 2011 Volume 2011:2 Pages 109—116

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/AMEP.S18359

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewer comments 5


Darlene Del Prato1, Esther Bankert2, Patricia Grust1, Joanne Joseph3
1Department of Nursing and Health Professions; 2Provost; 3Department of Psychology, State University of New York, Institute of Technology, Utica, NY, USA

Abstract: Nurse educators are facing the challenge of creating new ways of teaching and facilitating enhanced learning experiences in clinical practice environments that are inherently complex, highly demanding, and unpredictable. The literature consistently reports the negative effects of excess stress and unsupportive relationships on wellbeing, self-efficacy, self-esteem, learning, persistence, and success. However, understanding contributing factors of stress, such as the student's experiences of uncaring and oppressive interactions, is clearly not adequate. The transformation of nursing education requires a paradigm shift that embraces collegiality, collaboration, caring, and competence for students and the faculty. This paper reviews the literature on stress and its effects on nursing students. Grounded in theory related to stress and human caring, this paper focuses on the clinical environment and faculty-student relationships as major sources of students' stress and offers strategies for mitigating stress while fostering learning and professional socialization of future nurses.

Keywords: stress, faculty-student relationships, stress management, caring learning environment, incivility

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