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Thoracic solitary pedunculated osteochondroma in a child: a case report

Authors Wali Z, Khoshhal KI

Received 22 June 2013

Accepted for publication 2 August 2013

Published 23 October 2013 Volume 2013:5 Pages 75—79

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/ORR.S50343

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewer comments 2


Zubair Wali,1 Khalid I Khoshhal2

1Department of Orthopedic Surgery, King Fahd Hospital, Almadinah Almunawwarah, Saudi Arabia; 2Department of Orthopedic Surgery, College of Medicine, Taibah University, Almadinah Almunawwarah, Saudi Arabia

Objective: This case report describes the rare presentation of a thoracic pedunculated osteochondroma in a child, arising from the lamina of the fourth thoracic vertebra.
Clinical features: A 7-year-old girl was referred for the evaluation of a swelling in her back. The patient was suffering from atraumatic, progressive painless back swelling, of approximately 2 years duration. The physical examination showed a healthy child, with a well-defined mass, about 4 × 6 cm, located around the midline of the upper thoracic spine. No clinical signs of hereditary multiple exostoses were detected. Plain radiographs and computerized tomography were suggestive of a pedunculated osteochondroma arising from the lamina of the fourth thoracic vertebra.
Intervention and outcome: The patient underwent surgical excision of the mass. The pathologist confirmed the diagnosis. Follow up for 2 years did not show any evidence of clinical or radiological recurrence.
Conclusion: The current report describes a rare case and the management of a solitary pedunculated osteochondroma arising from the lamina of the fourth thoracic vertebra in a child below the age of 10 years.

Keywords: benign tumors, hereditary multiple exostoses, spine column tumors, thoracic vertebra

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