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The Psychological Impact of COVID-19 Outbreak on Nurses Working in the Northwest of Amhara Regional State Referral Hospitals, Northwest Ethiopia

Authors Mekonen E, Shetie B, Muluneh N

Received 3 December 2020

Accepted for publication 23 December 2020

Published 5 January 2021 Volume 2020:13 Pages 1353—1364

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/PRBM.S291446

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single anonymous peer review

Peer reviewer comments 3

Editor who approved publication: Professor Igor Elman


Enyew Mekonen,1 Belayneh Shetie,2 Niguse Muluneh3

1Department of Surgical Nursing, School of Nursing, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Gondar, Gondar, Ethiopia; 2Department of Emergency and Critical Care Nursing, School of Nursing, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Gondar, Gondar, Ethiopia; 3Department of Psychiatry, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Gondar, Gondar, Ethiopia

Correspondence: Enyew Mekonen Tel +251946607528
Email enyewgetaneh111@gmail.com

Introduction: The psychosocial consequences of the coronavirus pandemic are serious for health professionals including nurses because of a higher level of exposure. Nurses often face huge psychological pressure as a result of workload, long hours, and working in a high-risk environment. This study aimed to assess the prevalence and associated factors of anxiety, depression, and stress among nurses working in northwest Amhara referral hospitals.
Methods: Institution-based cross-sectional study was conducted from 25th September to 20th October 2020. A total of 302 nurses were selected using a simple random sampling technique. A structured pretested self-administered questionnaire was used to collect data. The data were entered into EpiData version 3 and analyzed using SPSS version 21. A binary logistic regression model was used to compute bivariable and multivariable analyses.
Results: The prevalence of anxiety, depression, and stress among nurses was 69.6%, 55.3%, and 20.5%, respectively. Unavailability of a guideline, fear of infecting family, and having chronic diseases increase the risk of developing anxiety. Nurses who did not have a guideline, received negative feedback from families, had a history of mental disorders, and chronic diseases have a higher odds of depression. Working in the night shift, lack of training, fear of infecting family, negative feedback from families, presence of confirmed/suspected cases in the family, and having chronic diseases increase the risk of developing stress.
Conclusion: More than two-thirds, more than half, and nearly one-fifth of the nurses had anxiety, depression, and stress, respectively. It is better to create awareness for the community, avail a guideline, train nurses, and give special attention to nurses with chronic disease and a history of mental disorders to minimize the psychological impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on nurses and protect their mental health. The government shall develop and implement national programs for occupational health and safety, prevent violence in the workplace, improve psychological well-being, and protect from physical and biological hazards to take care of the mental health of healthcare professionals during this pandemic.

Keywords: anxiety, COVID-19, depression, stress, nurses

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