Back to Browse Journals » Journal of Asthma and Allergy » Volume 3

The impact of food allergy on asthma

Authors Anupama Kewalramani, Mary E Bollinger

Published 28 July 2010 Volume 2010:3 Pages 65—74

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/JAA.S11789

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewer comments 2

Anupama Kewalramani, Mary E Bollinger

Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Allergy/Pulmonology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA

Abstract: Food allergy is a potentially severe immune response to a food or food additive. Although a majority of children will outgrow their food allergies, some may have lifelong issues. Food allergies and other atopic conditions, such as asthma, are increasing in prevalence in Western countries. As such, it is not uncommon to note the co-existence of food allergy and asthma in the same patient. As part of the atopic march, many food allergic patients may develop asthma later in life. Each can adversely affect the other. Food allergic patients with asthma have a higher risk of developing life-threatening food-induced reactions. Although food allergy is not typically an etiology of asthma, an asthmatic patient with food allergy may have higher rates of morbidity and mortality associated with the asthma. Asthma is rarely a manifestation of food allergy alone, but the symptoms can be seen with allergic reactions to foods. There may be evidence to suggest that early childhood environmental factors, such as the mother’s and child’s diets, factor in the development of asthma; however, the evidence continues to be conflicting. All food allergic patients and their families should be counseled on the management of food allergy and the risk of developing co-morbid asthma.

Keywords: food allergy, diagnosis, treatment, asthma

Creative Commons License This work is published and licensed by Dove Medical Press Limited. The full terms of this license are available at https://www.dovepress.com/terms.php and incorporate the Creative Commons Attribution - Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License. By accessing the work you hereby accept the Terms. Non-commercial uses of the work are permitted without any further permission from Dove Medical Press Limited, provided the work is properly attributed. For permission for commercial use of this work, please see paragraphs 4.2 and 5 of our Terms.

Download Article [PDF] 

 

Readers of this article also read:

Emerging and future therapies for hemophilia

Carr ME, Tortella BJ

Journal of Blood Medicine 2015, 6:245-255

Published Date: 3 September 2015

Is increasing the dose of Entecavir effective in partial virological responders?

Erturk A, Adnan Akdogan R, Parlak E, Cure E, Cumhur Cure M, Ozturk C

Drug Design, Development and Therapy 2014, 8:621-625

Published Date: 29 May 2014

Methacrylic-based nanogels for the pH-sensitive delivery of 5-Fluorouracil in the colon

Ashwanikumar N, Kumar NA, Nair SA, Kumar GS

International Journal of Nanomedicine 2012, 7:5769-5779

Published Date: 15 November 2012

Cross-linked acrylic hydrogel for the controlled delivery of hydrophobic drugs in cancer therapy

Deepa G, Thulasidasan AK, Anto RJ, Pillai JJ, Kumar GS

International Journal of Nanomedicine 2012, 7:4077-4088

Published Date: 27 July 2012

Particle size reduction to the nanometer range: a promising approach to improve buccal absorption of poorly water-soluble drugs

Rao S, Song Y, Peddie F, Evans AM

International Journal of Nanomedicine 2011, 6:1245-1251

Published Date: 20 June 2011

Topical diclofenac in the treatment of osteoarthritis of the knee

Niklas Schuelert, Fiona A Russell, Jason J McDougall

Orthopedic Research and Reviews 2011, 3:1-8

Published Date: 6 February 2011

Current and developing therapeutic agents in the treatment of Chagas disease

Werner Apt

Drug Design, Development and Therapy 2010, 4:243-253

Published Date: 17 September 2010