Back to Journals » Clinical Interventions in Aging » Volume 9

The Healthy Aging Brain Care (HABC) Monitor: validation of the Patient Self-Report Version of the clinical tool designed to measure and monitor cognitive, functional, and psychological health

Authors Monahan P, Alder C, Khan B, Stump T, Boustani M

Received 15 March 2014

Accepted for publication 2 July 2014

Published 5 December 2014 Volume 2014:9 Pages 2123—2132

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/CIA.S64140

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewer comments 3


Patrick O Monahan,1 Catherine A Alder,2–4 Babar A Khan,1–3 Timothy Stump,1 Malaz A Boustani1–4

1Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN, USA; 2Indiana University Center for Aging Research, Indianapolis, IN, USA; 3Regenstrief Institute Inc., Indianapolis, IN, USA; 4Eskenazi Health, Indianapolis, IN, USA

Background: Primary care providers need an inexpensive, simple, user-friendly, easily standardized, sensitive to change, and widely available multidomain instrument to measure the cognitive, functional, and psychological symptoms of patients suffering from multiple chronic conditions. We previously validated the Caregiver Report Version of the Healthy Aging Brain Care Monitor (HABC Monitor) for measuring and monitoring the severity of symptoms through caregiver reports. The purpose of this study was to assess the reliability and validity of the Patient Self-Report Version of the HABC Monitor (Self-Report HABC Monitor).
Design: Cross-sectional study.
Setting: Primary care clinics affiliated with a safety net urban health care system in Indianapolis, Indiana, USA.
Subjects: A total of 291 subjects aged ≥65 years with a mean age of 72.7 (standard deviation 6.2) years, 76% female, and 56% African Americans.
Analysis: Psychometric validity and reliability of the Self-Report HABC Monitor.
Results: Among 291 patients analyzed, the Self-Report HABC Monitor demonstrated excellent fit for the confirmatory factor analysis model (root mean square error of approximation =0.030, comparative fit index =0.974, weighted root mean square residual =0.837) and good internal consistency (0.78–0.92). Adequate convergent–divergent validity (differences between the Telephone Interview for Cognitive Status test-based cognitive function impairment versus nonimpairment groups) was demonstrated only when patients were removed from analysis if they had both cognitive function test impairment and suspiciously perfect self-report HABC Monitor cognitive floor scores of 0.
Conclusion: The Self-Report HABC Monitor demonstrates good reliability and validity as a clinically practical multidimensional tool for measuring symptoms. The tool can be used along with its caregiver version to provide useful feedback (via monitoring of symptoms) for modifying care plans. Determining the validity of HABC Monitor scores from patients who self-report a perfect cognitive score of 0 requires cognitive function test results (eg, Telephone Interview for Cognitive Status or Mini Mental State Examination) or Caregiver Report HABC Monitor scores or further clinical examination to rule out the possibility that the patient is denying or unaware of their cognitive symptoms.

Keywords: symptoms, monitor, validation, cognitive, psychological, functional

Creative Commons License This work is published and licensed by Dove Medical Press Limited. The full terms of this license are available at https://www.dovepress.com/terms.php and incorporate the Creative Commons Attribution - Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License. By accessing the work you hereby accept the Terms. Non-commercial uses of the work are permitted without any further permission from Dove Medical Press Limited, provided the work is properly attributed. For permission for commercial use of this work, please see paragraphs 4.2 and 5 of our Terms.

Download Article [PDF]  View Full Text [HTML][Machine readable]