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The clinical usefulness of natural killer cell activity in patients with suspected or diagnosed prostate cancer: an observational cross-sectional study

Authors Song W, Yu JW, Jeong BC, Seo SI, Jeon SS, Lee HM, Choi HY, Kang ES, Jeon HG

Received 23 March 2018

Accepted for publication 6 June 2018

Published 6 July 2018 Volume 2018:11 Pages 3883—3889

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/OTT.S169094

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewers approved by Dr Cristina Weinberg

Peer reviewer comments 3

Editor who approved publication: Dr Carlos E Vigil


Wan Song,1 Ji Woong Yu,2 Byong Chang Jeong,2 Seong Il Seo,2 Seong Soo Jeon,2 Hyun Moo Lee,2 Han Yong Choi,3 Eun-Suk Kang,4 Hwang Gyun Jeon2

1Department of Urology, Ewha Womans University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea; 2Department of Urology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea; 3Department of Urology, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea; 4Department of Laboratory Medicine and Genetics, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea

Purpose: To investigate the clinical usefulness of natural killer cell activity (NKA) for detection of prostate cancer (PCa) and prediction of Gleason grade.
Patients and methods: We prospectively enrolled 221 patients who underwent transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy for suspected PCa due to elevated prostate-specific antigen (PSA) >2.5 ng/mL or abnormal findings on digital rectal examination (n=146), or who were diagnosed with PCa (n=75) between 2016 and 2017. The NKA was compared according to PCa and Gleason grade. Correlation analysis was used to evaluate associations among NKA, PCa, and Gleason grade, and expressed using distribution dot plots. The absolute risk and relative risk of PCa, and odds ratios at different cut-off values of NKA were calculated.
Results: Of the total 221 patients, PCa was identified in 135 (61.9%) patients. When patients were divided according to PCa, there was no significant difference in NKA (1,267.6 vs 1,198.9 pg/mL, P=0.491). Furthermore, in 135 patients with PCa, the NKA was not significantly different according to Gleason grade (P=0.893). These results were not changed when confined to the patients with PSA between 2.5 and 10.0 ng/mL (P=0.654 and P=0.672, respectively). In addition, there was no significant difference in the risk of PCa at different cut-off values of NKA.
Conclusion: These results indicate that NKA does not appear to be very useful for detection of PCa and prediction of Gleason grade. Further large multi-institutional studies are required to verify the role of NKA in PCa detection and Gleason grade prediction.

Keywords: immunosurveillance, natural killer cell activity, prostate cancer, Gleason score

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