Back to Journals » Patient Preference and Adherence » Volume 14

The Association Among Medication Beliefs, Perception of Illness and Medication Adherence in Ischemic Stroke Patients: A Cross-Sectional Study in China

Authors Ruksakulpiwat S, Liu Z, Yue S, Fan Y

Received 18 October 2019

Accepted for publication 21 December 2019

Published 13 February 2020 Volume 2020:14 Pages 235—247

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/PPA.S235107

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single anonymous peer review

Peer reviewer comments 2

Editor who approved publication: Dr Naifeng Liu


Video abstract presented by Suebsarn Ruksakulpiwat.

Views: 570

Suebsarn Ruksakulpiwat,1,2 Zhaojun Liu,1 Shihong Yue,1 Yuying Fan1,2

1The Second Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Harbin, Heilongjiang Province, People’s Republic of China; 2College of Nursing, Harbin Medical University, Harbin, Heilongjiang Province, People’s Republic of China

Correspondence: Yuying Fan
The Second Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Harbin, Heilongjiang Province, People’s Republic of China; College of Nursing, Harbin Medical University, 157 Baojian Road, Nangang Distinct, Harbin 150086, Heilongjiang Province, People’s Republic of China
Tel +86 13603630368
Email fanfanfensituan@126.com

Purpose: To examine the association and the mediating effect among medication beliefs, perception of illness, and medication adherence in ischemic stroke patients.
Patients and Methods: This is a cross-sectional study, 306 ischemic stroke patients recruited from The Second Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, China between June 2018 and October 2018. The Beliefs about Medications Questionnaire (BMQ) was used to assess a patient’s beliefs about medication. The Brief Illness Perceptions Questionnaire (BIPQ) was used to rapidly determine the cognitive and emotional representation of ischemic stroke. Self-reported adherence was assessed using the Medication Adherence Report Scale (MARS). Logistic regression analysis, Pearson correlations, and mediation analysis were used to evaluate the association and mediating effects among medication beliefs, perception of illness, and medication adherence.
Results: Overall, 220 (65.48%) participants were non-adherent to their ischemic stroke medications. Non-adherent patients had greater stroke severity (p = 0.031) compared to adherent patients. After adjusting for demographic characteristics, specific concern (odds ratio [OR]: 0.652, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.431 to 0.987, p-value [P] = 0.043), and the perception of illness (overall score) (OR: 0.964, 95% CI: 0.944 to 0.985, P = 0.001) were significantly associated with medication adherence in ischemic stroke patients. The mediation analysis showed the significant indirect effects of specific concern, general overuse, and general harm. It suggested that some impacts of medication beliefs have been mediated on medication adherence.
Conclusion: Perceived concern about adverse effects of medicines and perception of illness have an influential impact on self-reported medication adherence in ischemic stroke patients. To enhance adherence, patients’ beliefs about medication and perceptions of their disease should be reconsidered. Future work should investigate interventions to influence patient adherence by addressing concerns about their ischemic stroke medications and the perception of the disease.

Keywords: ischemic stroke patients, medication beliefs, perception of illness, medication adherence

Creative Commons License This work is published and licensed by Dove Medical Press Limited. The full terms of this license are available at https://www.dovepress.com/terms.php and incorporate the Creative Commons Attribution - Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License. By accessing the work you hereby accept the Terms. Non-commercial uses of the work are permitted without any further permission from Dove Medical Press Limited, provided the work is properly attributed. For permission for commercial use of this work, please see paragraphs 4.2 and 5 of our Terms.

Download Article [PDF]  View Full Text [HTML][Machine readable]