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Teaching methods used by internal medicine residents on rounds: what works?

Authors Kulkarni VT, Salgado SM, Pelletier SR, Shields HM

Received 22 August 2018

Accepted for publication 23 December 2018

Published 21 January 2019 Volume 2019:10 Pages 15—21

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/AMEP.S181153

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewers approved by Dr Andrew Yee

Peer reviewer comments 2

Editor who approved publication: Dr Anwarul Azim Majumder


Vivek T Kulkarni,1 Sanjay M Salgado,2,3 Stephen R Pelletier,4 Helen M Shields3,5,6

1Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Medicine, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA; 2Hospitalist Service, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA, USA; 3Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; 4Office of Educational Quality Improvement, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; 5Division of Medical Communications, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA, USA; 6Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Endoscopy, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA, USA

Background: The specific teaching methods used by internal medicine residents on walk rounds are unknown.
Objectives: 1) To characterize in real time the specific teaching methods used by internal medicine residents on rounds and 2) to identify attributes of successful resident teaching on rounds.
Materials and methods: We conducted a prospective mixed-methods study on inpatient medical services at a single academic medical center from September 2016 to January 2017. Participants were internal medicine residents (postgraduate year [PGY]-1, PGY-2, and PGY-3) and attending physicians. Teachers were PGY-2 and PGY-3 residents, and learners were PGY-1 residents. Residents’ teaching on rounds was observed and characterized according to resident demographics, specific teaching methods, and length of time. Participants completed a survey with Likert scale and free-text questions.
Results and conclusion: Among 136 surveys across 28 separate teaching encounters, we noted that PGY-3 residents’ teaching was rated significantly better than PGY-2 residents’ teaching. Teaching lasting >1 minute was rated significantly better than teaching lasting

Keywords: internal medicine, resident teaching, mixed methods, direct observation


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