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Syringocystadenoma papilliferum in the right lower abdomen: a case report and review of literature

Authors Xu D, Bi T, Lan H, Yu W, Wang W, Cao F, Jin K 

Received 14 January 2013

Accepted for publication 18 February 2013

Published 26 March 2013 Volume 2013:6 Pages 233—236

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/OTT.S42732

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single anonymous peer review

Peer reviewer comments 3

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Dong Xu,1,2 Tienan Bi,3,2 Huanrong Lan,3,2 Wenjie Yu,1 Wenmin Wang,1 Feilin Cao,1,2 Ketao Jin1,2

1Department of Surgical Oncology, Taizhou Hospital, Wenzhou Medical University, Linhai, Zhejiang, People’s Republic of China; 2Laboratory of Translational Oncology, Public Research Platform, Taizhou Hospital, Wenzhou Medical University, Linhai, Zhejiang, People’s Republic of China; 3Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Taizhou Hospital, Wenzhou Medical University, Linhai, Zhejiang, People’s Republic of China

Abstract: Syringocystadenoma papilliferum (SCAP) is an uncommon benign adnexal tumor of the skin. It is frequently seen in association with other benign adnexal lesions, such as nevus sebaceous, apocrine nevus, tubular apocrine adenoma, apocrine hidrocystoma, apocrine cystadenoma, and clear cell syringoma. The unusual reported locations of SCAP include the head and neck, the buttock, the vulva, the scrotum, the pinna, the eyelid, the outer ear canal, the forehead, the back, the scalp, the thigh, the nipple, the axilla, and the postoperative scar. The occurrence of SCAP in the right lower abdomen is distinctly uncommon. Herein, we report an unusual case of a 41-year-old man with SCAP occurring in the right lower abdomen that did not develop malignancy, despite a long disease course and an absence of medical treatment. The clinical and histopathologic features and the differential diagnosis of SCAP are also discussed.

Keywords: adnexal, skin tumor, benign

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