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Surgical treatment for medically refractory myasthenic blepharoptosis

Authors Shimizu Y, Suzuki S, Nagasao T, Ogata H, Yazawa M, Suzuki N, Kishi K

Received 24 June 2014

Accepted for publication 24 July 2014

Published 19 September 2014 Volume 2014:8 Pages 1859—1867

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/OPTH.S69883

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewer comments 3

Editor who approved publication: Dr Scott Fraser


Yusuke Shimizu,1 Shigeaki Suzuki,2 Tomohisa Nagasao,1 Hisao Ogata,1 Masaki Yazawa,1 Norihiro Suzuki,2 Kazuo Kishi1

1Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, 2Department of Neurology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan

Purpose: Currently, only a few reports have recommended surgery as a suitable treatment for blepharoptosis associated with myasthenia gravis. The present study aims to introduce our surgical criteria, surgical options, outcomes, and precautions for medically refractory myasthenic blepharoptosis.
Patients and methods: Eight patients who failed to respond to at least 2 years of medical treatment and who underwent blepharoptosis surgery, from January 2008 to December 2011, were enrolled in this study. Medical records, photographs, and questionnaire results regarding postoperative status were evaluated. Of the eleven procedures performed, four involved frontal suspension, four involved external levator advancement, one involved nonincisional transconjunctival levator advancement, and two involved subbrow blepharoplasty with orbicularis oculi muscle tucking. The margin reflex distance improved postoperatively in seven patients.
Results: Seven patients had very minimal scarring, and one had minimal scarring. Five patients showed no eyelid asymmetry, one had subtle asymmetry, and two had obvious asymmetry. Seven patients were very satisfied, and one patient was satisfied with the overall result. Postoperative complications included mild lid lag with incomplete eyelid closure, prolonged scar redness, and worsened heterophoria. No patient experienced postoperative exposure keratitis or recurrent blepharoptosis during the study period.
Conclusion: Our results indicate that blepharoptosis surgery is effective for patients with myasthenia gravis, especially those with residual blepharoptosis despite multiple sessions of medical treatments. We recommend that neurologists and surgeons collaborate more systematically and discuss comprehensive treatment plans to increase the quality of life for patients with myasthenia gravis.

Keywords: ptosis, myasthenia gravis, ocular myasthenia, blepharoplasty

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