Back to Journals » Cancer Management and Research » Volume 11

Surgery of primary tumor improves the survival of newly diagnosed metastatic melanoma: a population-based, propensity-matched study

Authors Zhang D, Dong Y, Sun X, Yuan S, Yu J

Received 11 September 2018

Accepted for publication 3 December 2018

Published 27 December 2018 Volume 2019:11 Pages 339—346

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/CMAR.S187208

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewers approved by Dr Colin Mak

Peer reviewer comments 3

Editor who approved publication: Professor Nakshatri


Dongxiao Zhang,1,2 Yinjun Dong,3 Xiubin Sun,4 Shuanghu Yuan,2 Jinming Yu2

1School of Medicine, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong 250000, China; 2Department of Radiation Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital Affiliated to Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong 250117, China; 3Department of Thoracic Surgery, Shandong Cancer Hospital Affiliated to Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong 250117, China; 4School of Public Health, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong 250000, China

Background: For the melanoma patients who are with the primary tumor and metastatic disease concurrently (the newly diagnosed metastatic patients), the effect of primary tumor surgery on survival has never been discussed.
Objective: We sought to estimate this effect based on data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database.
Patients and methods: We identified patients with newly diagnosed metastatic melanoma from 2004 to 2015. The effect of primary tumor surgery was assessed by using Cox proportional hazard regression modeling and propensity score matching.
Results: Eight thousand three hundred and forty-one patients who had been diagnosed with primary melanoma and metastatic disease at the same time were included in this analysis, of whom 2,554 (30.6%) received primary tumor surgery. In multivariable analysis of the unmatched cohort, primary tumor surgery was an independent protective factor of overall survival (HR =0.617, 95% CI 0.565–0.674; P<0.001) and melanoma-specific survival (HR =0.599, 95% CI 0.537–0.668; P<0.001). In the matched cohort, primary tumor surgery was still associated with better overall survival (13 vs 6 months, P<0.001) and melanoma-specific survival (18 vs 6 months, P<0.001).
Conclusion: Our results reveal the benefit of primary tumor surgery on the survival of patients with newly diagnosed metastatic melanoma and may fill in the gaps of guidelines for this population.
IRB: IRB approval is not required because the SEER data are freely accessible.

Keywords: melanoma, metastatic, surgery, survival, propensity score, Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database, SEER

Creative Commons License This work is published and licensed by Dove Medical Press Limited. The full terms of this license are available at https://www.dovepress.com/terms.php and incorporate the Creative Commons Attribution - Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License. By accessing the work you hereby accept the Terms. Non-commercial uses of the work are permitted without any further permission from Dove Medical Press Limited, provided the work is properly attributed. For permission for commercial use of this work, please see paragraphs 4.2 and 5 of our Terms.

Download Article [PDF]  View Full Text [HTML][Machine readable]