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Status epilepticus in patients with genetic (idiopathic) generalized epilepsy

Authors Bosak M, Pawełczak D, Słowik A

Received 18 March 2019

Accepted for publication 15 May 2019

Published 20 June 2019 Volume 2019:15 Pages 1585—1592

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/NDT.S209084

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewers approved by Ms Justinn Cochran

Peer reviewer comments 2

Editor who approved publication: Dr Roger Pinder


Magdalena Bosak,1 Dominika Pawełczak,2 Agnieszka Słowik1

1Department of Neurology, Jagiellonian University Medical College, Krakow, Poland; 2Department of Neurology, Jagiellonian University Medical College, Krakow, Poland

Aim of the study: Genetic (idiopathic) generalized epilepsies (GGEs) account for nearly one-third of all epilepsies. The frequency of status epilepticus (SE) in patients with GGEs has been poorly studied. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the frequency of different forms of SE in a cohort of patients with GGEs.Materials and methods: Among 153 patients with GGEs treated at the university epilepsy clinic in the period between 1998 and 2018, those with SE were retrospectively identified.Results: Absence SE was diagnosed in 8 patients (13 episodes), while myoclonic SE was found in 2 patients (2 episodes). No cases of tonic–clonic SE were detected in the study cohort. Most SE episodes were found to be provoked by ill-advised antiepileptic drugs or changes in drug regimen. In all the subjects, SE was stopped by intravenous administration of diazepam and/or valproate. Long-term outcome of epilepsy was good, with most patients (70%) being seizure-free.Conclusion: Status epilepticus is not a rare phenomenon in patients with genetic generalized epilepsies, with absence SE being the most common type. Most cases of SE are provoked by ill-advised AEDs or changes in drug regimen. Status epilepticus in GGEs can be easily treated with benozdiazepines and/or valproate. Status epilepticus in GGEs can be easily treated with benozdiazepines and/or valproate.

Keywords: absence status epilepticus, myoclonic status epilepticus, genetic generalized epilepsy

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