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Sensory disturbances, inhibitory deficits, and the P50 wave in schizophrenia

Authors Vlcek P, Bob P, Raboch J

Received 17 March 2014

Accepted for publication 14 April 2014

Published 14 July 2014 Volume 2014:10 Pages 1309—1315

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/NDT.S64219

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewer comments 4

Premysl Vlcek,1 Petr Bob,1,2 Jiri Raboch1

1Center for Neuropsychiatric Research of Traumatic Stress, Department of Psychiatry and UHSL, First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic; 2Central European Institute of Technology (CEITEC), Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic

Abstract: Sensory gating disturbances in schizophrenia are often described as an inability to filter redundant sensory stimuli that typically manifest as inability to gate neuronal responses related to the P50 wave, characterizing a decreased ability of the brain to inhibit various responses to insignificant stimuli. It implicates various deficits of perceptual and attentional functions, and this inability to inhibit, or “gate”, irrelevant sensory inputs leads to sensory and information overload that also may result in neuronal hyperexcitability related to disturbances of habituation mechanisms. These findings seem to be particularly important in the context of modern electrophysiological and neuroimaging data suggesting that the filtering deficits in schizophrenia are likely related to deficits in the integrity of connections between various brain areas. As a consequence, this brain disintegration produces disconnection of information, disrupted binding, and disintegration of consciousness that in terms of modern neuroscience could connect original Bleuler’s concept of “split mind” with research of neural information integration.

Keywords: event-related potential, information overload, inhibition, P50 wave, schizophrenia, splitting

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