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Safety, tolerability, and efficacy of fixed combination therapy with dorzolamide hydrochloride 2% and timolol maleate 0.5% in glaucoma and ocular hypertension

Authors Nicholas P Bell, José L Ramos, Robert M Feldman

Published 22 November 2010 Volume 2010:4 Pages 1331—1346

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/OPTH.S14054

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Peer reviewer comments 5

Nicholas P Bell, José L Ramos, Robert M Feldman
Robert Cizik Eye Clinic, Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, The University of Texas Medical School at Houston, Houston, Texas 77030, USA

Abstract: Glaucoma is a collection of diseases characterized by multifactorial progressive changes leading to visual field loss and optic neuropathy most frequently due to elevated intraocular pressure (IOP). The goal of treatment is the lowering of the IOP to prevent additional optic nerve damage. Treatment usually begins with topical pharmacological agents as monotherapy, progresses to combination therapy with agents from up to 4 different classes of IOP-lowering medications, and then proceeds to laser or incisional surgical modalities for refractory cases. The fixed combination therapy with the carbonic anhydrase inhibitor dorzolamide hydrochloride 2% and the beta blocker timolol maleate 0.5% is now available in a generic formulation for the treatment of patients who have not responded sufficiently to monotherapy with beta adrenergic blockers. In pre- and postmarketing clinical studies, the fixed combination dorzolamide–timolol has been shown to be safe and efficacious, and well tolerated by patients. The fixed combination dorzolamide–timolol is convenient for patients, reduces their dosing regimen with the goal of increasing their compliance, reduces the effects of “washout” when instilling multiple drops, and reduces the preservative burden by reducing the number of drops administered per day.

Keywords: dorzolamide, timolol, glaucoma, ocular hypertension, elevated IOP, fixed combination therapy

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