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Ruxolitinib In The Treatment Of Polycythemia Vera: An Update On Health-Related Quality Of Life And Patient-Reported Outcomes

Authors Cingam S, Flatow-Trujillo L, Andritsos LA, Arana Yi C

Received 12 April 2019

Accepted for publication 7 October 2019

Published 14 November 2019 Volume 2019:10 Pages 381—390

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/JBM.S177692

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewer comments 3

Editor who approved publication: Dr Martin H. Bluth


Shashank Cingam,1 Lainey Flatow-Trujillo,2 Leslie A Andritsos,1 Cecilia Arana Yi1

1University of New Mexico Comprehensive Cancer Center, Albuquerque, NM, USA; 2Department of Internal Medicine, University of New Mexico School of Medicine, Albuquerque, NM, USA

Correspondence: Cecilia Arana Yi
University of New Mexico Comprehensive Cancer Center, 1201 Camino De Salud NE, Albuquerque, NM 87131, USA
Email caranayi@salud.unm.edu

Abstract: Polycythemia vera (PV) is a rare myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN) associated with significant impairment in quality of life (QoL) due to disease-related symptoms and complications. Assessment of disease burden constitutes standard monitoring of symptoms and response. Conventional treatments for MPN, such as hydroxyurea, phlebotomy, or interferon, have not shown a significant impact in QoL or patient-reported outcomes (PRO). Ruxolitinib (RUX) is a JAK2 inhibitor approved for patients intolerant or resistant to hydroxyurea (HA). We conducted a systematic review of clinical trials of RUX in patients with PV that incorporated PRO measures to evaluate the effects on PRO and QoL. Three randomized Phase 3 studies reported in four publications were relevant for analysis. Although the small number of trials and potential for treatment bias in the review, treatment with RUX was associated with improved QoL and PRO in PV patients intolerant or resistant to hydroxyurea.

Keywords: polycythemia vera, ruxolitinib, quality of life, patient-reported outcomes


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