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Role of fesoterodine in the treatment of overactive bladder

Authors Mansfield K

Published 17 December 2009 Volume 2010:2 Pages 1—9

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/RRU.S5171

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewer comments 3


Kylie J Mansfield

Graduate School of Medicine, University of Wollongong, NSW, Australia

Abstract: Muscarinic receptors have long been the target receptors for treatment of patients with overactive bladder (OAB). These patients experience symptoms of urgency, urinary frequency and nocturia, with or without urge incontinence (the involuntary leakage of urine associated with urge). Fesoterodine, a pro-drug, structurally and functionally related to tolterodine, is the newest agent developed for the treatment of OAB. Fesoterodine is broken down to the active metabolite, 5-hydroxy-methyl-tolterodine (5-HMT) by non-specific esterases. This metabolism results in the complete breakdown of the parent compound and is responsible for dose related improvements in clinical efficacy and health related quality of life. Like other antimuscarinic agents including tolterodine, fesoterodine is associated with improvements in clinical variables related both to bladder filling (decreasing micturition frequency and increasing mean voided volume) and urgency (urgency and urge incontinence episodes). Improvements in health related quality of life following treatment with fesoterodine is indicated by improvements in 7 of the 9 variables measured by the King’s Health Questionnaire. Also like other antimuscarinic agents, fesoterodine use is associated with adverse events including dry mouth. However the incidence of dry mouth is reduced with fesoterodine, compared to oxybutynin, due to the improved bladder selectivity of 5-HMT.

Keywords: fesoterodine, 5-hydroxymethyl-tolterodine, muscarinic, overactive bladder, urgency, incontinence

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