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Association of COVID-19 Pandemic with Undergraduate Medical Students’ Perceived Stress and Coping [Response to Letter]

Authors Abdulghani HM, Sattar K, Ahmad T, Akram A

Received 13 November 2020

Accepted for publication 13 November 2020

Published 27 November 2020 Volume 2020:13 Pages 1101—1102

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/PRBM.S292018

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Hamza Mohammad Abdulghani, Kamran Sattar, Tauseef Ahmad, Ashfaq Akram

Department of Medical Education, College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

Correspondence: Kamran Sattar
Department of Medical Education, College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
Email [email protected]

This is in response to the letter by Jie and Muhammad. We appreciate the interest in our article particularizing the Association of COVID-19 Pandemic with undergraduate Medical Students’ Perceived Stress and Coping,1 and your comments. Our primary goal was to delineate an approach used by the medical students in terms of their coping strategies adopted to tackle the stress ascending from the current pandemic situation. In our college, the male-female ratio contrasts;2 additionally, our investigation essentially required volunteer participation.1 which leads us to a natural but unequal number of participants (ie male and female). Moreover, as a well-recognised practice in contemporary research, our results were presented as the percentage of participants, not their numbers. Therefore, there does not remain any issue of partiality. 

 

View the original paper by Abdulghani and colleagues

 

This is in response to the Letter to the Editor

 

Dear editor

This is in response to the letter by Jie and Muhammad. We appreciate the interest in our article particularizing the Association of COVID-19 Pandemic with undergraduate Medical Students’ Perceived Stress and Coping,1 and your comments. Our primary goal was to delineate an approach used by the medical students in terms of their coping strategies adopted to tackle the stress ascending from the current pandemic situation. In our college, the male-female ratio contrasts;2 additionally, our investigation essentially required volunteer participation.1 which leads us to a natural but unequal number of participants (ie male and female). Moreover, as a well-recognised practice in contemporary research, our results were presented as the percentage of partcipants, not their numbers. Therefore, there does not remain any issue of partiality.

Moreover, it was also stated that we might have included other modern recreational activities. We think that adding up more such options would somewhat lengthen the survey without adding up any more robustness to the study. It shall also be noted that we used “exercise” in general without “detailing it” (what type), and we let our respondents determine and relate it for whatever they are doing (aerobics, gymnastics, free weight, strength exercise, etc.).

However, an important point was raised about clarifying the terms used, and we thank and intend to be observant and shall apply in any of our future research.

Disclosure

The authors report no conflicts of interest in this communication.

References

1. Abdulghani HM, Sattar K, Ahmad T, Akram A. Association of COVID-19 pandemic with undergraduate medical students’ perceived stress and coping. Psychol Res Behav Manag. 2020;13:871–881. doi:10.2147/PRBM.S276938

2. Information. KSUTVRfDaQDoSa. King Saud University Bulletin Undergraduate Studies 2–2 (Sciences and Health Colleges); 2010.

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