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Resilience, depression, and quality of life in elderly individuals with chronic pain followed up in an outpatient clinic in the city of São Paulo, Brazil

Authors Morete MC, Solano JPC, Boff MS, Filho WJ, Ashmawi HA

Received 12 March 2018

Accepted for publication 25 July 2018

Published 26 October 2018 Volume 2018:11 Pages 2561—2566

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/JPR.S166625

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewer comments 2

Editor who approved publication: Dr E Alfonso Romero-Sandoval


Marcia C Morete,1 João Paulo C Solano,2 Mario S Boff,3 Wilson J Filho,3 Hazem A Ashmawi3

1School of Medicine, University of São Paulo, Santos, São Paulo, Brazil; 2Department of Medicine, São Camilo University, São Paulo, Brazil; 3School of Medicine, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil

Purpose: In this study, we assessed resilience, depression, and quality of life in a group of elderly individuals with or without chronic pain.
Patients and methods: A cross-sectional study assessing elderly individuals followed up at a geriatrics outpatient clinic and divided into two groups: 54 elderly patients with chronic pain and 54 elderly with no chronic pain.
Results: The sample comprised mainly women (67.6%), with mean age 79.9 years. The mean resilience index in the group with pain was 69.4 and, in the group with no pain, 80.1 (P<0.001). Depression was observed in 35.2% of patients with chronic pain; there was no case of depression in those without chronic pain. Quality of life of the elderly with chronic pain was worse in all the domains assessed: physical, mental, emotional, social, vitality, and pain.
Conclusion: In the study sample, resilience was lower, depression was more frequent, and quality of life was worse in the group of elderly with chronic pain.

Keywords:
pain, older, resilience

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