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Relationship between jaw opening force and hyoid bone dynamics in healthy elderly subjects

Authors Shinozaki H, Tohara H, Matsubara M, Inokuchi N, Yamazaki Y, Nakane A, Wakasugi Y, Minakuchi S

Received 23 December 2016

Accepted for publication 27 February 2017

Published 3 April 2017 Volume 2017:12 Pages 629—634

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/CIA.S130946

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewers approved by Dr Akshita Wason

Peer reviewer comments 2

Editor who approved publication: Dr Richard Walker

Hiromichi Shinozaki, Haruka Tohara, Mariko Matsubara, Nobuhiro Inokuchi, Yasuhiro Yamazaki, Ayako Nakane, Yoko Wakasugi, Shunsuke Minakuchi

Department of Gerodontology, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo, Japan

Purpose: This study aimed to examine the relationship between jaw opening force and hyoid bone dynamics and resting position in elderly individuals based on gender.
Subjects and methods: Subjects were 36 healthy elderly individuals aged ≥65 years without dysphagia (16 men and 20 women; mean age 75.5 years, range 65–88 years). Videofluorographic images during the swallowing of 10 mL of 40% (w/v) barium sulfate were obtained and the degrees of anterior, superior, and hypotenuse displacements of the hyoid bone and maximum/resting hyoid position were evaluated. Jaw opening force was measured three times using a jaw opening force sthenometer; the mean of these three measurements was used for analysis.
Results: In men, there was a positive correlation between jaw opening force and resting hyoid position and negative correlations among all the degrees of anterior, superior, and hypotenuse displacements of the hyoid bone. In women, there was no statistically significant correlation between jaw opening force and any of the measurement items. There was no statistically significant correlation between jaw opening force and maximum hyoid position in either men or women.
Conclusion: Our findings suggest that low jaw opening force leads to low resting hyoid position only in elderly men, and a lower hyoid position in healthy elderly men results in a larger total amount of hyoid displacement during swallowing. Moreover, a maximum hyoid position in healthy individuals of either gender does not differ depending on their jaw opening force.

Keywords: aging, deglutition disorders, dysphasia, gender differences

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