Back to Journals » Drug Design, Development and Therapy » Volume 13

Recent advances in the treatment of pathogenic infections using antibiotics and nano-drug delivery vehicles

Authors Giau VV, An SSA, Hulme J

Received 11 October 2018

Accepted for publication 30 November 2018

Published 18 January 2019 Volume 2019:13 Pages 327—343

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/DDDT.S190577

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewer comments 4

Editor who approved publication: Dr Tuo Deng


Vo Van Giau, Seong Soo A An, John Hulme

Department of Bionano Technology, Gachon Bionano Research Institute, Gachon University, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do, South Korea

Abstract: The worldwide misuse of antibiotics and the subsequent rise of multidrug-resistant pathogenic bacteria have prompted a paradigm shift in the established view of antibiotic and bacterial–human relations. The clinical failures of conventional antibiotic therapies are associated with lengthy detection methods, poor penetration at infection sites, disruption of indigenous microflora and high potential for mutational resistance. One of the most promising strategies to improve the efficacy of antibiotics is to complex them with micro or nano delivery materials. Such materials/vehicles can shield antibiotics from enzyme deactivation, increasing the therapeutic effectiveness of the drug. Alternatively, drug-free nanomaterials that do not kill the pathogen but target virulent factors such as adhesins, toxins, or secretory systems can be used to minimize resistance and infection severity. The main objective of this review is to examine the potential of the aforementioned materials in the detection and treatment of antibiotic-resistant pathogenic organisms.

Keywords: antibiotics, resistance, polymer, chitosan, gold, recombinant, targeted, pathogen


Creative Commons License This work is published and licensed by Dove Medical Press Limited. The full terms of this license are available at https://www.dovepress.com/terms.php and incorporate the Creative Commons Attribution - Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License. By accessing the work you hereby accept the Terms. Non-commercial uses of the work are permitted without any further permission from Dove Medical Press Limited, provided the work is properly attributed. For permission for commercial use of this work, please see paragraphs 4.2 and 5 of our Terms.

Download Article [PDF]  View Full Text [HTML][Machine readable]