Back to Journals » OncoTargets and Therapy » Volume 11

Radiotherapy for one rectal cancer patient with cirrhosis and moderate to severe thrombocytopenia: a case report

Authors Shi X, Xia H, Zhang W, Li G, Li A

Received 18 May 2018

Accepted for publication 2 August 2018

Published 27 August 2018 Volume 2018:11 Pages 5203—5207

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/OTT.S174638

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewers approved by Dr Andrew Yee

Peer reviewer comments 3

Editor who approved publication: Dr Leo Jen-Liang Su


Xinqi Shi, Huifang Xia, Weiwei Zhang, Guang Li, Ailin Li

Department of Radiation Oncology, The First Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang, Liaoning, China

Abstract: When patients with cirrhosis and severe thrombocytopenia suffer malignant tumors, there is usually no effective and feasible treatment method due to the high risk of hemorrhage. Herein, we report a case in which radiotherapy was given to a patient with a strong desire for the treatment. The patient was a 66-year-old man with a 13-year history of cirrhosis and a 10-year history of thrombocytopenia, and was diagnosed with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC; T4aN1M0, stage IIIB). The platelet count before radiotherapy was 32 × 109/L, and the blood coagulation was normal. The severity of thrombocytopenia increased after 2 Gy × 7 fractions pelvic radiation, with platelet counts dropping to 16 × 109/L. Platelet counts failed to return to pre-therapy levels after supporting therapy including recombinant human interleukin 11 subcutaneous injection and platelet transfusion. Although radiotherapy was discontinued eventually, the data presented here represent a valuable resource that can help inform treatment decisions for tumor patients with cirrhosis and thrombocytopenia.

Keywords: rectal cancer, liver cirrhosis, thrombocytopenia, radiotherapy

Creative Commons License This work is published and licensed by Dove Medical Press Limited. The full terms of this license are available at https://www.dovepress.com/terms.php and incorporate the Creative Commons Attribution - Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License. By accessing the work you hereby accept the Terms. Non-commercial uses of the work are permitted without any further permission from Dove Medical Press Limited, provided the work is properly attributed. For permission for commercial use of this work, please see paragraphs 4.2 and 5 of our Terms.

Download Article [PDF]  View Full Text [HTML][Machine readable]