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Rabbit anti-thymocyte globulin induction in renal transplantation: review of the literature

Authors Andress L, Gupta A, Siddiqi N, Marfo K

Received 22 October 2013

Accepted for publication 4 December 2013

Published 15 January 2014 Volume 2014:6 Pages 9—21

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/TRRM.S36734

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single anonymous peer review

Peer reviewer comments 3


Leah Andress,1 Anjali Gupta,2 Nida Siddiqi,3 Kwaku Marfo2,3

1University at Buffalo School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Pharmacy Practice, Buffalo, 2Montefiore Medical Center, The University Hospital for Albert Einstein College of Medicine Department of Abdominal Organ Transplant Program, Bronx, 3Montefiore Medical Center, Department of Pharmacy, Bronx, NY, USA

Abstract: Rabbit anti-thymocyte globulin (rATG) has proven benefit as induction therapy in renal transplant recipients, achieving reduced acute rejection rates and better short-term allograft function, with slightly higher rates of complications such as infections and malignancy. Compared with other agents, the most benefit from rATG induction has been observed in renal transplant recipients at high immunologic risk for rejection. However, in special populations, such as pediatrics, the elderly, and hepatitis C-positive and human immunodeficiency virus-positive renal transplant recipients, additional information is needed to delineate the absolute benefit of rATG induction compared with other induction agents. Selection of rATG as the choice of induction therapy in renal transplant recipients should be guided by a cost-effective approach in balancing efficacy, safety, and cost. This review summarizes the published literature on efficacy, safety, and cost of rATG induction in renal transplantation.

Keywords: anti-thymocyte globulin, renal transplantation, induction therapy

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