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Propofol sedation in colonoscopy: from satisfied patients to improved quality indicators

Authors Abu Baker F, Mari A, Amarney K, Hakeem AR, Ovadia B, Kopelman Y

Received 4 September 2018

Accepted for publication 23 January 2019

Published 26 February 2019 Volume 2019:12 Pages 105—110

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/CEG.S186393

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewers approved by Dr Colin Mak

Peer reviewer comments 3

Editor who approved publication: Prof. Dr. Everson L.A. Artifon


Fadi Abu Baker,1 Amir Mari,1 Kamal Aamarney,2 Abu Ras Hakeem,3 Barouch Ovadia,1 Yael Kopelman,1

1Gastroenterology and Hepatology Department, Hillel Yaffe Medical Center, affiliated to the Ruth and Rappaport Faculty of Medicine, Haifa, Israel; 2Pharmacy Services Department, Hillel Yaffe Medical Center, affiliated to the Ruth and Rappaport Faculty of Medicine, Haifa, Israel; 3Anesthesiology Department, Hillel Yaffe Medical Center, affiliated to the Ruth and Rappaport Faculty of Medicine, Haifa, Israel

Background: Propofol-mediated sedation is safe and clearly associated with increased patient satisfaction. However, whether it results in a favorable effect on colonoscopy outcomes and performance compared to standard sedation with benzodiazepines/opiates remains unclear.
Objectives: To determine the effect of propofol-mediated sedation on colonoscopy-quality measures compared to traditional sedation.
Methods: A large cohort of 44,794 patients who had undergone sedated colonoscopies were included. Colonoscopy-quality indicators were examined in benzodiazepine/opiate-sedated patients and compared with a propofol-mediated sedation group. Adjustment for potential confounders, such as age, sex, quality of bowel preparation, procedural setting, and indication was performed.
Results: Patients who received propofol-mediated sedation were more likely, and in a dose-dependent manner, to have an enhanced polyp-detection rate (22.8% vs 20.9%, P<0.001), cecal intubation rate (90.4% vs 87.3%, P<0.001), and terminal ileum-intubation rate (6.4% vs 1.6%, P<0.001). On multivariate analysis, these findings were maintained, as propofol-mediated sedation use was significantly associated with improved colonoscopy indicators.
Conclusion: Propofol-mediated sedation during colonoscopy is associated with better examination performance and improved outcomes. Further prospective or randomized trials to support these findings are warranted.

Keywords: cecal intubation rate, colonoscopy, polyp-detection rate, propofol-mediated sedation, quality indicators

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