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Progression of carotid-artery disease in type 2 diabetic patients: a cohort prospective study

Authors Bosevski M, Stojanovska L

Received 11 December 2014

Accepted for publication 7 July 2015

Published 16 October 2015 Volume 2015:11 Pages 549—553

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/VHRM.S79079

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewer comments 5

Editor who approved publication: Professor Daniel Duprez


Marijan Bosevski,1 Lily Stojanovska2

1Faculty of Medicine, University Cardiology Clinic, Skopje, Macedonia; 2Centre for Chronic Disease, College of Health and Biomedicine, Victoria University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia

Abstract: In order to assess the progression of carotid-artery disease in type 2 diabetic cohort (n=207 patients), the dynamic change in carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) and the occurrence of plaques were followed for a period of 31.35±10.59 months. The mean CIMT at the beginning of the study was 0.9178±0.1447 mm, with a maximal value of 1.1210±0.2366 mm. The maximal value of CIMT changed by 0.07 mm/year. Progression of CIMT was noted in 86.8% and its regression in 7.8% of patients. The occurrence of carotid plaques was detected in 41.8% of patients. Multiple regression analysis revealed the maximal value of CIMT to be associated with diastolic blood pressure, despite mean CIMT being predicted by body mass index. The presence of peripheral arterial disease and hypo-high-density lipoproteinemia were found to be predictors for the occurrence of carotid plaques. Our data have clinical implications in predicting risk factors for the progression of carotid-artery disease in type 2 diabetic patients for their appropriate management.

Keywords: carotid IMT, type 2 diabetes, progression of atherosclerosis, risk factors
 

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