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Progress of Clinical Trials for the Treatment of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

Authors Chen T, Liu D, Yao X

Received 7 November 2020

Accepted for publication 31 December 2020

Published 22 January 2021 Volume 2021:14 Pages 315—327

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/DMSO.S290749

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single anonymous peer review

Peer reviewer comments 2

Editor who approved publication: Prof. Dr. Juei-Tang Cheng


Tong Chen,1 Dan Liu,1 Xiaofeng Yao2

1Department of Endocrinology, First Affiliated Hospital of Dalian Medical University, Dalian, Liaoning, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Preventive Medicine, Dalian Medical University, Dalian, Liaoning, People’s Republic of China

Correspondence: Dan Liu
Department of Endocrinology, First Affiliated Hospital of Dalian Medical University, Zhongshan Str. 222, Dalian 116011, People’s Republic of China
Email liudandan303114@163.com
Xiaofeng Yao
Department of Preventive Medicine, Dalian Medical University, 9 W Lushun South Road, Dalian 116044, People’s Republic of China
Email yaoxiaofeng@dmu.edu.cn

Abstract: Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is one of the most common and severe complications of pregnancy, which is not only associated with perinatal complications but also has a long-term adverse effect on maternal and their offsprings. At present, the treatment of GDM focuses on the control of maternal blood glucose. Although lifestyle changes, hypoglycemic drugs, blood glucose monitoring, and other medicines that can improve maternal blood glucose to a certain extent, there are still some patients affected and have adverse pregnancy outcomes. The prevention of GDM and the treatment of improving pregnancy outcomes are urgently needed. This review summarized recently published clinical trials related with the treatment of GDM, aiming to provide additional options for the treatment of GDM.

Keywords: gestational diabetes mellitus, clinical trials, review

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