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Prevalence of fibromyalgia in fourteen Korean tertiary care university hospital pain clinics

Authors Lee HJ, Choi EJ, Nahm FS, Choi SS, Kim YH, Moon JY, Kim SH, Cho CW, Lee PB

Received 25 April 2018

Accepted for publication 25 June 2018

Published 17 October 2018 Volume 2018:11 Pages 2417—2423

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/JPR.S172221

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single anonymous peer review

Peer reviewer comments 2

Editor who approved publication: Dr E Alfonso Romero-Sandoval


Ho-Jin Lee,1 Eunjoo Choi,1 Francis Sahngun Nahm,1 Seong-Soo Choi,2 Young-Hoon Kim,3 Jee Youn Moon,4 Shin Hyung Kim,5 Chan-Woo Cho,6 Pyung Bok Lee1,7

1Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam, Republic of Korea; 2Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul, Republic of Korea; 3Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Seoul St. Mary’s Hospital, Seoul, Republic of Korea; 4Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, Republic of Korea; 5Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Severance Hospital, Seoul, Republic of Korea; 6Seoul Chan Pain Clinic, Seoul, Republic of Korea; 7Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul, Republic of Korea

Purpose: We aimed to investigate the prevalence of fibromyalgia (FM) in patients who visited outpatient pain clinics in Korea, using the modified 2010 American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria and to evaluate comorbid conditions that may be associated with FM.
Patients and methods: Outpatients, aged ≥18 years, who first visited pain clinics at any of the 14 tertiary care university hospitals, were recruited for this study. Modified 2010 ACR criteria were used to diagnose FM. Participants’ demographic information and eleven comorbid measures (sleep disturbance, fatigue, irritable bowel syndrome, amnesia, hypothyroidism, headache, anxiety, depression, rheumatism, low back pain, and history of traffic accident) were also investigated via additional questionnaires.
Results: We recruited 1,233 outpatients (754 men and 479 women). Based on the modified 2010 ACR criteria, 13.38% (165/1,233 patients, 95% CI: 11.48–15.28) of patients had FM. As participants with a history of FM were excluded, the prevalence of FM was 11.0% (123/1,118 patients). Patients with FM were more likely to have one or more of the eleven predetermined comorbid conditions. Patients who were female and who had a previous history of FM, sleep disturbance, headache, or a history of traffic accident were more likely to have FM.
Conclusion: FM, according to the modified 2010 ACR criteria, appears to be a common disorder among chronic pain patients referred to tertiary care university hospital pain clinics. Therefore, physicians treating pain should consider this prevalence of FM among pain clinic patients.

Keywords: tertiary care centers, chronic pain, diagnosis, fibromyalgia

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