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Postpartum family planning: current evidence on successful interventions

Authors Blazer C, Prata N

Received 21 October 2015

Accepted for publication 26 January 2016

Published 11 April 2016 Volume 2016:7 Pages 53—67

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/OAJC.S98817

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewers approved by Dr Linfeng Wu

Peer reviewer comments 6

Editor who approved publication: Professor Igal Wolman


Cassandra Blazer, Ndola Prata

Bixby Center for Population, Health, and Sustainability, School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, CA, USA

Abstract: We reviewed existing evidence of the efficacy of postpartum family planning interventions targeting women in the 12 months postpartum period in low- and middle-income countries. We searched for studies from January 1, 2004 to September 19, 2015, using the US Preventive Services Task Force recommendations to assess evidence quality. Our search resulted in 26 studies: 11 based in sub-Saharan Africa, six in the Middle East and North Africa, and nine in Asia. Twenty of the included studies assessed health facility-based interventions. Three were focused on community interventions, two had community and facility components, and one was a workplace program. Overall quality of the evidence was moderate, including evidence for counseling interventions. Male partner involvement, integration with other service delivery platforms, such as prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV and immunization, and innovative product delivery programs may increase knowledge and use during the postpartum period. Community-based and workplace strategies need a much stronger base of evidence to prompt recommendations.

Keywords:
postpartum period, family planning, birth spacing, interventions, systematic review, contraception, less developed countries

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