Back to Journals » Clinical Ophthalmology » Volume 4

Photorefractive keratectomy: measuring the matrix metalloproteinase activity and chondroitin sulfate concentration in tear fluid

Authors Muto T, Nishio M, Matsumoto Y, Arai K, Chikuda M

Published 9 September 2010 Volume 2010:4 Pages 1015—1018

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/OPTH.S12381

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewer comments 3


Tetsuya Mutoh, Masaya Nishio, Yukihiro Matsumoto, Kiyomi Arai, Makoto Chikuda
Department of Ophthalmology, Dokkyo Medical University Koshigaya Hospital, Saitama, Japan

Abstract: We herein report the case of a 20-year-old man who underwent a photorefractive keratectomy (PRK). We measured matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) activity and chondroitin 4 sulfate and chondroitin 6 sulfate concentrations in tear fluid. Tear fluid was collected preoperatively via microcapillary tube, and was collected postoperatively on the first and fourth days, and after one week, one month, three months, and six months. Samples were formulated by dilution with 200 µL of saline. MMP-9 activity was analyzed by an enzyme immunocapture activity assay, and the concentrations of chondroitin sulfate were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. No complications were observed after surgery, except for a minimal subepithelial haze. Although MMP-9 activity changed on the fourth postoperative day, the activity changed only minimally at this time. Chondroitin 4 sulfate concentrations in tear fluid increased dramatically from one week to one month, decreased transiently at three months, and increased by six months. The chondroitin 6 sulfate concentration did not normalize within one week, and decreased from one week to three months compared with the preoperative score, and was close to the preoperative score at six months. We conclude that corneal wound healing was still incomplete six months after PRK, and chondroitin 4 sulfate appears to be critical in this process.

Keywords: matrix metalloproteinase, chondroitin sulfate, human tear fluid, photorefractive keratectomy, corneal wound healing

Creative Commons License This work is published and licensed by Dove Medical Press Limited. The full terms of this license are available at https://www.dovepress.com/terms.php and incorporate the Creative Commons Attribution - Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License. By accessing the work you hereby accept the Terms. Non-commercial uses of the work are permitted without any further permission from Dove Medical Press Limited, provided the work is properly attributed. For permission for commercial use of this work, please see paragraphs 4.2 and 5 of our Terms.

Download Article [PDF]