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Pharmacists and medication reconciliation: a review of recent literature

Authors Patel E, Pevnick JM, Kennelty KA

Received 16 November 2018

Accepted for publication 28 February 2019

Published 30 April 2019 Volume 2019:8 Pages 39—45

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/IPRP.S169727

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewers approved by Dr Colin Mak

Peer reviewer comments 3

Editor who approved publication: Professor Jonathan Ling


Eesha Patel,1 Joshua M Pevnick,2,3 Korey A Kennelty1

1Department of Pharmacy and Practice, Division of Health Services Research, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, USA; 2Department of Medicine, Division of General Internal Medicine, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, USA; 3Department of Biomedical Sciences, Division of Informatics, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, USA

Background: Adverse drug event (ADE) errors are common and costly in health care systems across the world. Medication reconciliation is a means to decrease these medication-related injuries and increase quality of care. Research has shown that medication reconciliation accuracy and efficiency improved when pharmacists are directly involved in the process.
Objective: We review studies examining how pharmacists impact the medication reconciliation process and we discuss pharmacists’ future roles during the medication reconciliation process and then barriers pharmacy staff may face during this critical process.
Methods: A comprehensive literature search from MEDLINE and manual searching of bibliographies was performed for the time period January 2012 through November 2018.
Conclusion: Although the issue of rising costs and injury due to medication errors in our health care system are not solvable via medication reconciliation alone, it is the first and perhaps most critical piece of the medication management puzzle. As such, numerous organizations have called for pharmacists to expand their roles in the medication reconciliation process due to their expertise in medication management.

Keywords: medication reconciliation, pharmacists, adverse drug events

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