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Peripheral sympathetic mechanisms in orofacial pain

Authors Fan W, Zhu X, He Y, Li H, Gu W, Huang F, He H

Received 6 July 2018

Accepted for publication 21 September 2018

Published 17 October 2018 Volume 2018:11 Pages 2425—2431

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/JPR.S179327

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single anonymous peer review

Peer reviewer comments 3

Editor who approved publication: Dr E Alfonso Romero-Sandoval


Wenguo Fan,1,2 Xiao Zhu,3 Yifan He,1 Hongmei Li,4 Wenzhen Gu,1 Fang Huang,1 Hongwen He1

1Institute of Stomatological Research, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Stomatology, Guangzhou, China; 2Department of Anesthesiology, Guanghua School of Stomatology, Hospital of Stomatology, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, China; 3The Public Service Platform of South China Sea for R&D Marine Biomedicine Resources, Marine Biomedical Research Institute, Guangdong Medical University, Zhanjiang, China; 4Department of Pathology, Guangdong Medical University, Dongguan, China

Abstract: Sympathetic nervous system (SNS) is a part of the autonomic nervous system which involuntarily regulates internal body functions. It appears to modulate the processing of nociceptive information. Many orofacial pain conditions involve inflammation of orofacial tissues and/or injury of nerve, some of which might be attributed to SNS. Thus, the aim of this review was to bring together the data available regarding the peripheral sympathetic mechanisms involved in orofacial pain. A clearer understanding of SNS–sensory interactions in orofacial pain may provide a basis for novel therapeutic strategies for conditions that respond poorly to conventional treatments.

Keywords: sympathetic nervous system, norepinephrine, adrenergic receptors, orofacial pain

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