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Optimal management of venous thromboembolism in advanced pancreatic cancer with low-molecular-weight heparin: current evidence

Authors Perl G, Brenner B, Ben-Aharon I

Received 6 April 2016

Accepted for publication 14 June 2016

Published 31 October 2016 Volume 2016:6 Pages 49—54

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/GICTT.S90695

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewers approved by Dr Lucy Goodman

Peer reviewer comments 2

Editor who approved publication: Dr Eileen O'Reilly


Gali Perl,1,2 Baruch Brenner,1,2 Irit Ben-Aharon1,2

1Institute of Oncology, Davidoff Center, Rabin Medical Center, Beilinson Hospital Campus, Petah Tikva, 2Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv, Israel

Abstract: Former evidence delineates a strong correlation between cancer and venous thromboembolic events (VTEs). Of all the malignancies, pancreatic cancer confers the highest risk for developing VTE during the course of the disease. The role of primary thromboprophylaxis in the comprehensive treatment of pancreatic cancer remains unclear. We have conducted a systematic review to assess the role of primary thromboprophylaxis in pancreatic cancer. Literature searches included PUBMED, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, and the database of clinical trials in order to identify relevant publications. Seven publications that included 6,003 patients were analyzed in our systematic review. The systematic review of current literature indicates that thromboprophylaxis reduces the risk of VTE without increasing the risk of major bleeding. However, data regarding survival benefits are inconclusive.

Keywords: low-molecular-weight heparin, pancreatic cancer, thrombophylaxis

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