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Once-daily NVA237 improves exercise tolerance from the first dose in patients with COPD: the GLOW3 trial

Authors Beeh KM, Singh D, Di Scala L, Drollmann A

Received 31 March 2012

Accepted for publication 11 June 2012

Published 31 July 2012 Volume 2012:7 Pages 503—513

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/COPD.S32451

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewer comments 3

Kai M Beeh,1 Dave Singh,2 Lilla Di Scala,3 Anton Drollmann3

1insaf Respiratory Research Institute, Wiesbaden, Germany; 2University Of Manchester, Medicines Evaluation Unit, University Hospital of South Manchester, Manchester, UK; 3Novartis Pharma AG, Basel, Switzerland

Introduction: Exercise limitation, dynamic hyperinflation, and exertional dyspnea are key features of symptomatic chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We assessed the effects of glycopyrronium bromide (NVA237), a once-daily, long-acting muscarinic antagonist, on exercise tolerance in patients with moderate to severe COPD.
Methods: Patients were randomized to a cross-over design of once-daily NVA237 50 µg or placebo for 3 weeks, with a 14-day washout. Exercise endurance, inspiratory capacity (IC) during exercise, IC and expiratory volumes from spirometry, plethysmographic lung volumes, leg discomfort and dyspnea under exercise (Borg scales), and transition dyspnea index were measured on Days 1 and 21 of treatment. The primary endpoint was endurance time during a submaximal constant-load cycle ergometry test on Day 21.
Results: A total of 108 patients were randomized to different treatment groups (mean age, 60.5 years; mean post-bronchodilator, forced expiratory volume in 1 second [FEV1] 57.1% predicted). Ninety-five patients completed the study. On Day 21, a 21% difference in endurance time was observed between patients treated with NVA237 and those treated with placebo (P < 0.001); the effect was also significant from Day 1, with an increase of 10%. Dynamic IC at exercise isotime and trough FEV1 showed significant and clinically relevant improvements from Day 1 of treatment that were maintained throughout the study. This was accompanied by inverse decreases in residual volume and functional residual capacity. NVA237 was superior to placebo (P < 0.05) in decreasing leg discomfort (Borg CR10 scale) on Day 21 and exertional dyspnea on Days 1 and 21 (transition dyspnea index and Borg CR10 scale at isotime). The safety profile of NVA237 was similar to that of the placebo.
Conclusion: NVA237 50 µg once daily produced immediate and significant improvement in exercise tolerance from Day 1. This was accompanied by sustained reductions in lung hyperinflation (indicated by sustained and significant improvements in IC at isotime), and meaningful improvements in trough FEV1 and dyspnea. Improvements in exercise endurance increased over time, suggesting that mechanisms beyond improved lung function may be involved in enhanced exercise tolerance. (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01154127).

Keywords: COPD, dyspnea, FEV1, exercise tolerance, LAMA, NVA237

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