Back to Journals » OncoTargets and Therapy » Volume 11

Novel EXO-T vaccine using polyclonal CD4+ T cells armed with HER2-specific exosomes for HER2-positive breast cancer

Authors Li R, Chibbar R, Xiang J

Received 22 August 2018

Accepted for publication 1 October 2018

Published 17 October 2018 Volume 2018:11 Pages 7089—7093

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/OTT.S184898

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single anonymous peer review

Peer reviewer comments 3

Editor who approved publication: Dr Arseniy Yuzhalin


Rong Li,1,2 Rajni Chibbar,3 Jim Xiang1,2

1Cancer Research Cluster, Saskatchewan Cancer Agency, Saskatoon, SK, Canada; 2Department of Oncology, College of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, Canada; 3Department of Pathology, College of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, Canada

Abstract:
Breast cancer is the leading cause of death in women globally. The human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-positive breast cancer is often associated with poor prognosis and high mortality. Even though anti-HER2 monoclonal antibodies have improved the clinical outcome, resistance to the antibody therapy becomes a major obstacle in the treatment of HER2-positive breast cancer patients. Alternative approaches are therefore needed. HER2-specific vaccines have been developed to trigger patient’s immune system against HER2-positive breast cancer. This article describes the development of novel HER2-specific exosome (EXO)-T vaccine using polyclonal CD4+ T cells armed with HER2-specific dendritic cell-released EXO and demonstrates its therapeutic effect against HER2-positive tumor in double-transgenic HER2/HLA-A2 mice with HER2-specific self-immune tolerance. Therefore, our novel HER2-specific EXO-T vaccines are likely to assist in the treatment of HER2-positive breast cancer patients.

Keywords: EXO-T vaccine, polyclonal CD4+, T cell, HER2, exosome, breast cancer

Creative Commons License This work is published and licensed by Dove Medical Press Limited. The full terms of this license are available at https://www.dovepress.com/terms.php and incorporate the Creative Commons Attribution - Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License. By accessing the work you hereby accept the Terms. Non-commercial uses of the work are permitted without any further permission from Dove Medical Press Limited, provided the work is properly attributed. For permission for commercial use of this work, please see paragraphs 4.2 and 5 of our Terms.

Download Article [PDF]  View Full Text [HTML][Machine readable]